Wellness Events Begin Monday March 13!

For you, your friends and your honey are all welcome to experience these special experiences to help you get back to yourself in all areas of your life in an inventive, creative, healing way. 

Magical Marriage & Relationship Mondays

Do you desire more meaning, connection, intimacy & separation of household chores/organization in your relationship?  Then, please feel free to take the time for you, your honey, and the health of your household by exploring deeplove. deeplove and SYMBIS (Saving Your Marriage Before It Starts & Re-marriage) are both in the form of assessments taken by the couple, books with homework and individual couple coaching sessions. Jenny Bair, MHE, has several packages to help you and your love make your heart’s desires happen. It’s best to start with a 15-minute phone consult and she guide you to the best option for you or you and your love.  All sessions can be done in person, via phone or zoom. So, set up your phone consult today by calling 972-930-0260.  So, when you sign up for any sessions or packages on a Magical Monday; you’ll receive a special gift of a “Spicy Passion” essential oil blend made by Jenny.  She offers day and evening appointments on Magical Mondays for your convenience. These services are best for the serious daters, pre-engaged, engaged and married couples.

 Read more about Jenny’s marriage coaching services here:

About

Total Immersion Education Tuesdays

We set aside free or very reasonable educational events with all of the providers at Living Well Health and Wellness on Tuesday evenings.  So, stay tuned with the newsletter and our social media to see what the latest and greatest topics and speakers will be offering you. 

Wellness Wednesdays 

Several practitioners are offering special rates on popular services for Wellness Wednesday. This is a chance to experience something new!  We encourage you to take time for your personal well-being every day at Living Well. Wellness Wednesdays makes that easy.  We look forward to seeing you make time for yourself, body, mind and spirit.

 

 

 

Be Free! Program Launch – MOVED to 3/17

Be Free! Ignite Your Life-style Program Debut Info Session

MOVED to March 17th, 6:30-8pm with Jenny Bair @ Living Well Health & Wellness

This program has been brewing to fruition since 2009 and is ready now to debut just for you! This program is designed for ladies who desire accountability with a coach and other “buddies” on the same journey but still want the flexibility to pave their own path on their wellness journey (emotional, relational, physical, organizational, sexual, mental, spiritual, creativity & fun, cooking, will all be areas of focus in this program). 
On the 24th, Jenny will cover what the program entails, how it works, what you receive and how to make it work for you. This session is FREE. If you attend,  and sign up for the program at the debut session you will receive an extra gift of wellness.  You don’t have to live in Dallas to participate; the majority of the program is communicated through email, social media and phone calls. Program starts March 1st, 2015.
Below is more about the Be Free! Ignite Your Life Program –
Stay motivated 365 Days with Life Coach, Jenny Bair, MHE. She has 20 years of expertise in leading people to their A-Ha moments and the lives they want to lead. There are 52 weeks of rich life content in the Be Free! program such as: Creative Cooking, New Food/Life Recipes, Spicing up Exercise, Friend Dates, Love-Dovey Dates, New Hobbies, Accepting your Glorious-ness, Reducing Stress, Embracing your Sensuality, Power Naps, Choice & Time Management, All things Organization, Parenting & Intimacy Topics- all of the juicy life adventure material.
You’ll receive in this program: a Set of 52 cards, Weekly Action Tip E-mails with Inner Work, Monthly Q & A Coaching Calls, Quarterly Food and Life Recipes, and Mixer Events. Your bonus: you’ll get coaching help individually and as a group and have the ability to connect with others in the program. This program will involve multi-media, social media, telephone and in-person events for those that are local. You can choose what works for you. Make your desires for your health and your life a reality this year with a little love and expert guided support. Call 972-930-0260 for more information or to register for the program. You can also email info@livingwelldallas.com.

Take action to make 2015 your year. The program introductory price is $149.00 for one season/quarter which starts in March. The entire year is $399.00, savings of $48.  Use the code”Be Free!” to get your discount.

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals