Online Free Event for the Mompreneuer

 

Last call!
I didn’t want you to miss out on this exclusive Free video interview series, hosted by my friend, Leah Laprise.
This Free Series is called, The Freedom Mompreneur Live and you can sign up for it here!
Leah has searched the globe, far and wide, interviewing super successful women in business. And guess what? I’m one of them!
You will learn how to create and boost your authentic business from home doing what you love so that you can spend more time with your family.
A Freedom Mompreneur is a Mom:
  • who is a freedom entrepreneur who makes money in her authentic business from home.
  • who knows that when she is fulfilled she is a better parent and a better lover.
  • who is available for her family and spends fun, quality time with her kids.
  • And… she sets clear boundaries and respects her needs
If you desire that kind of lifestyle… if you want to hear from other moms and women who make this their everyday reality, then…
— Register now for The Freedom Mompreneur Live. This Free online event ends May 4th, so now’s your Chance to Change Your Life!

You’ve got to check it out. Between you and me, it’s like a mommy empowerment movement!

Stop wishing you had more balance and fulfillment in your life.

Learn how to create it today.

Much Love,
Betty
P.S. Like I said, this event will not be available after May 4th, so sign up before it’s too late.

Healthy Drinks to Beat the Bulge

By Betty Murray

Liquid diets are never recommended as a long-term diet solution (unless you have specific health problems that require you to be on a liquid diet), but weight loss drinks may help you shed a few unwanted pounds quickly, particularly if you have reached a plateau in your weight loss.

Replacing meals with protein shakes can reduce your daily caloric intake, resulting in weight loss. However, you will eventually need to return to eating solid foods, at which time you may regain any weight that was lost. Relying too much on protein drinks also means you’re missing out on the nutritional value of whole foods.

When Protein Shakes Can Help

The average adult should get at least 46 to 56 grams of protein per day (possibly more, depending on your weight). If you are already eating a healthy, nutrient-rich diet but are struggling to get adequate protein, adding a protein shake to your daily diet can help you get closer to the recommended daily dose of protein. Protein increases calorie burn, so upping your protein intake can boost weight loss.

When Protein Shakes (and other weight loss drinks) Can Hurt

Even though a shake or drink isn’t a solid food, it still contains calories—and you might be surprised just how many calories are in a drink. Protein powder, though it varies, generally contains about 140 calories per serving, so a protein shake made from protein powder could contain as many as 300 calories. One Special K Milk Chocolate Protein Shake contains 190 calories.

Unless your physician has prescribed a liquid diet to battle other health concerns, going on a strict liquid diet simply to lose weight is not ideal. If your weight loss has stalled out, or you just need to lose a few pounds before heading to the beach, try replacing one meal a day with a protein shake.

The best formula for weight loss is to maintain a healthy, nutrient-dense, protein-rich diet and to get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise every week.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine and founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Living Well Dallas and she is the Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. She specializes in autoimmune conditions, MTHFR, digestive disorders and complex health issues.  Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

Healthy Drinks to Beat the Bulge

By Betty Murray

Liquid diets are never recommended as a long-term diet solution (unless you have specific health problems that require you to be on a liquid diet), but weight loss drinks may help you shed a few unwanted pounds quickly, particularly if you have reached a plateau in your weight loss.

Replacing meals with protein shakes can reduce your daily caloric intake, resulting in weight loss. However, you will eventually need to return to eating solid foods, at which time you may regain any weight that was lost. Relying too much on protein drinks also means you’re missing out on the nutritional value of whole foods.

When Protein Shakes Can Help

The average adult should get at least 46 to 56 grams of protein per day (possibly more, depending on your weight). If you are already eating a healthy, nutrient-rich diet but are struggling to get adequate protein, adding a protein shake to your daily diet can help you get closer to the recommended daily dose of protein. Protein increases calorie burn, so upping your protein intake can boost weight loss.

When Protein Shakes (and other weight loss drinks) Can Hurt

Even though a shake or drink isn’t a solid food, it still contains calories—and you might be surprised just how many calories are in a drink. Protein powder, though it varies, generally contains about 140 calories per serving, so a protein shake made from protein powder could contain as many as 300 calories. One Special K Milk Chocolate Protein Shake contains 190 calories.

Unless your physician has prescribed a liquid diet to battle other health concerns, going on a strict liquid diet simply to lose weight is not ideal. If your weight loss has stalled out, or you just need to lose a few pounds before heading to the beach, try replacing one meal a day with a protein shake.

The best formula for weight loss is to maintain a healthy, nutrient-dense, protein-rich diet and to get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise every week.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine and founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Living Well Dallas and she is the Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. She specializes in autoimmune conditions, MTHFR, digestive disorders and complex health issues.  Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

Your Life in Balance


By Betty Murray

The types and amounts of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins you take in on a daily basis matter. But ultimately, what matters when it comes to weight loss and weight management is calories. Balancing how many calories you take in with the number of calories your body burns is the secret to losing weight and keeping it off.

What’s your caloric balance? If you are maintaining your current weight, you are consuming about the same amount of calories your body is using. If you are gaining weight, you’re in caloric excess, which means you’re consuming more calories than your body is burning. If you are losing weight, it means you’re in caloric deficit, and eating fewer calories than your body is using.

When the body is in caloric deficit, it begins to pull stored fat from cells in the body to use as energy, thus reducing the amount of fat in your body and decreasing your weight.

How many calories should I consume?

Keep in mind that one bound of body fat is equal to approximately 3,500 calories. Start by keeping a food journal and writing down all the foods and drinks you consume each day. This will help you have a better understanding of how many calories you’re consuming on a daily basis. Also keep track of your daily physical activity and the length of time you do it.

Not sure how many calories you’re eating or how many you’re losing through exercise? MyFitnessPal is a great free resource to track your food and exercise to find out if you are in caloric balance. MyFitnessPal will also show you the nutrients that are in your food, so you can easily see if you are getting enough vitamins, minerals, protein, etc.

A Fitbit is another tool you can use to help you stay motivated by tracking your physical activity. Fitbit will sync with MyFitness Pal to give you an accurate picture of your daily calories in/calories out.

How much exercise do I need?

The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes (30 minutes, five days a week) of moderate intensity exercise per week for the average adult. This recommendation is based on keeping the heart healthy and strong. If you want to lose weight, you may need to increase the amount and intensity of your exercise.

Remember, some exercise is better than no exercise. You do not have to get in a full 30 minutes of exercise at one time. If your schedule does not allow you to spend that much time exercising at once, break it down into smaller segments throughout the day. Ten minutes here or there will make a big difference.

By using tools like Fitbit and MyFitness Pal, you can easily keep track of the calories you consume and the calories you burn on a daily basis, giving you the information and the motivation you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

 

Your Life in Balance


By Betty Murray

The types and amounts of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins you take in on a daily basis matter. But ultimately, what matters when it comes to weight loss and weight management is calories. Balancing how many calories you take in with the number of calories your body burns is the secret to losing weight and keeping it off.

What’s your caloric balance? If you are maintaining your current weight, you are consuming about the same amount of calories your body is using. If you are gaining weight, you’re in caloric excess, which means you’re consuming more calories than your body is burning. If you are losing weight, it means you’re in caloric deficit, and eating fewer calories than your body is using.

When the body is in caloric deficit, it begins to pull stored fat from cells in the body to use as energy, thus reducing the amount of fat in your body and decreasing your weight.

How many calories should I consume?

Keep in mind that one bound of body fat is equal to approximately 3,500 calories. Start by keeping a food journal and writing down all the foods and drinks you consume each day. This will help you have a better understanding of how many calories you’re consuming on a daily basis. Also keep track of your daily physical activity and the length of time you do it.

Not sure how many calories you’re eating or how many you’re losing through exercise? MyFitnessPal is a great free resource to track your food and exercise to find out if you are in caloric balance. MyFitnessPal will also show you the nutrients that are in your food, so you can easily see if you are getting enough vitamins, minerals, protein, etc.

A Fitbit is another tool you can use to help you stay motivated by tracking your physical activity. Fitbit will sync with MyFitness Pal to give you an accurate picture of your daily calories in/calories out.

How much exercise do I need?

The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes (30 minutes, five days a week) of moderate intensity exercise per week for the average adult. This recommendation is based on keeping the heart healthy and strong. If you want to lose weight, you may need to increase the amount and intensity of your exercise.

Remember, some exercise is better than no exercise. You do not have to get in a full 30 minutes of exercise at one time. If your schedule does not allow you to spend that much time exercising at once, break it down into smaller segments throughout the day. Ten minutes here or there will make a big difference.

By using tools like Fitbit and MyFitness Pal, you can easily keep track of the calories you consume and the calories you burn on a daily basis, giving you the information and the motivation you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

 

Your Life in Balance


By Betty Murray

The types and amounts of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins you take in on a daily basis matter. But ultimately, what matters when it comes to weight loss and weight management is calories. Balancing how many calories you take in with the number of calories your body burns is the secret to losing weight and keeping it off.

What’s your caloric balance? If you are maintaining your current weight, you are consuming about the same amount of calories your body is using. If you are gaining weight, you’re in caloric excess, which means you’re consuming more calories than your body is burning. If you are losing weight, it means you’re in caloric deficit, and eating fewer calories than your body is using.

When the body is in caloric deficit, it begins to pull stored fat from cells in the body to use as energy, thus reducing the amount of fat in your body and decreasing your weight.

How many calories should I consume?

Keep in mind that one bound of body fat is equal to approximately 3,500 calories. Start by keeping a food journal and writing down all the foods and drinks you consume each day. This will help you have a better understanding of how many calories you’re consuming on a daily basis. Also keep track of your daily physical activity and the length of time you do it.

Not sure how many calories you’re eating or how many you’re losing through exercise? MyFitnessPal is a great free resource to track your food and exercise to find out if you are in caloric balance. MyFitnessPal will also show you the nutrients that are in your food, so you can easily see if you are getting enough vitamins, minerals, protein, etc.

A Fitbit is another tool you can use to help you stay motivated by tracking your physical activity. Fitbit will sync with MyFitness Pal to give you an accurate picture of your daily calories in/calories out.

How much exercise do I need?

The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes (30 minutes, five days a week) of moderate intensity exercise per week for the average adult. This recommendation is based on keeping the heart healthy and strong. If you want to lose weight, you may need to increase the amount and intensity of your exercise.

Remember, some exercise is better than no exercise. You do not have to get in a full 30 minutes of exercise at one time. If your schedule does not allow you to spend that much time exercising at once, break it down into smaller segments throughout the day. Ten minutes here or there will make a big difference.

By using tools like Fitbit and MyFitness Pal, you can easily keep track of the calories you consume and the calories you burn on a daily basis, giving you the information and the motivation you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

 

Your Life in Balance


By Betty Murray

The types and amounts of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins you take in on a daily basis matter. But ultimately, what matters when it comes to weight loss and weight management is calories. Balancing how many calories you take in with the number of calories your body burns is the secret to losing weight and keeping it off.

What’s your caloric balance? If you are maintaining your current weight, you are consuming about the same amount of calories your body is using. If you are gaining weight, you’re in caloric excess, which means you’re consuming more calories than your body is burning. If you are losing weight, it means you’re in caloric deficit, and eating fewer calories than your body is using.

When the body is in caloric deficit, it begins to pull stored fat from cells in the body to use as energy, thus reducing the amount of fat in your body and decreasing your weight.

How many calories should I consume?

Keep in mind that one bound of body fat is equal to approximately 3,500 calories. Start by keeping a food journal and writing down all the foods and drinks you consume each day. This will help you have a better understanding of how many calories you’re consuming on a daily basis. Also keep track of your daily physical activity and the length of time you do it.

Not sure how many calories you’re eating or how many you’re losing through exercise? MyFitnessPal is a great free resource to track your food and exercise to find out if you are in caloric balance. MyFitnessPal will also show you the nutrients that are in your food, so you can easily see if you are getting enough vitamins, minerals, protein, etc.

A Fitbit is another tool you can use to help you stay motivated by tracking your physical activity. Fitbit will sync with MyFitness Pal to give you an accurate picture of your daily calories in/calories out.

How much exercise do I need?

The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes (30 minutes, five days a week) of moderate intensity exercise per week for the average adult. This recommendation is based on keeping the heart healthy and strong. If you want to lose weight, you may need to increase the amount and intensity of your exercise.

Remember, some exercise is better than no exercise. You do not have to get in a full 30 minutes of exercise at one time. If your schedule does not allow you to spend that much time exercising at once, break it down into smaller segments throughout the day. Ten minutes here or there will make a big difference.

By using tools like Fitbit and MyFitness Pal, you can easily keep track of the calories you consume and the calories you burn on a daily basis, giving you the information and the motivation you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

 

Your Life in Balance


By Betty Murray

The types and amounts of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins you take in on a daily basis matter. But ultimately, what matters when it comes to weight loss and weight management is calories. Balancing how many calories you take in with the number of calories your body burns is the secret to losing weight and keeping it off.

What’s your caloric balance? If you are maintaining your current weight, you are consuming about the same amount of calories your body is using. If you are gaining weight, you’re in caloric excess, which means you’re consuming more calories than your body is burning. If you are losing weight, it means you’re in caloric deficit, and eating fewer calories than your body is using.

When the body is in caloric deficit, it begins to pull stored fat from cells in the body to use as energy, thus reducing the amount of fat in your body and decreasing your weight.

How many calories should I consume?

Keep in mind that one bound of body fat is equal to approximately 3,500 calories. Start by keeping a food journal and writing down all the foods and drinks you consume each day. This will help you have a better understanding of how many calories you’re consuming on a daily basis. Also keep track of your daily physical activity and the length of time you do it.

Not sure how many calories you’re eating or how many you’re losing through exercise? MyFitnessPal is a great free resource to track your food and exercise to find out if you are in caloric balance. MyFitnessPal will also show you the nutrients that are in your food, so you can easily see if you are getting enough vitamins, minerals, protein, etc.

A Fitbit is another tool you can use to help you stay motivated by tracking your physical activity. Fitbit will sync with MyFitness Pal to give you an accurate picture of your daily calories in/calories out.

How much exercise do I need?

The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes (30 minutes, five days a week) of moderate intensity exercise per week for the average adult. This recommendation is based on keeping the heart healthy and strong. If you want to lose weight, you may need to increase the amount and intensity of your exercise.

Remember, some exercise is better than no exercise. You do not have to get in a full 30 minutes of exercise at one time. If your schedule does not allow you to spend that much time exercising at once, break it down into smaller segments throughout the day. Ten minutes here or there will make a big difference.

By using tools like Fitbit and MyFitness Pal, you can easily keep track of the calories you consume and the calories you burn on a daily basis, giving you the information and the motivation you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

 

Your Life in Balance


By Betty Murray

The types and amounts of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins you take in on a daily basis matter. But ultimately, what matters when it comes to weight loss and weight management is calories. Balancing how many calories you take in with the number of calories your body burns is the secret to losing weight and keeping it off.

What’s your caloric balance? If you are maintaining your current weight, you are consuming about the same amount of calories your body is using. If you are gaining weight, you’re in caloric excess, which means you’re consuming more calories than your body is burning. If you are losing weight, it means you’re in caloric deficit, and eating fewer calories than your body is using.

When the body is in caloric deficit, it begins to pull stored fat from cells in the body to use as energy, thus reducing the amount of fat in your body and decreasing your weight.

How many calories should I consume?

Keep in mind that one bound of body fat is equal to approximately 3,500 calories. Start by keeping a food journal and writing down all the foods and drinks you consume each day. This will help you have a better understanding of how many calories you’re consuming on a daily basis. Also keep track of your daily physical activity and the length of time you do it.

Not sure how many calories you’re eating or how many you’re losing through exercise? MyFitnessPal is a great free resource to track your food and exercise to find out if you are in caloric balance. MyFitnessPal will also show you the nutrients that are in your food, so you can easily see if you are getting enough vitamins, minerals, protein, etc.

A Fitbit is another tool you can use to help you stay motivated by tracking your physical activity. Fitbit will sync with MyFitness Pal to give you an accurate picture of your daily calories in/calories out.

How much exercise do I need?

The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes (30 minutes, five days a week) of moderate intensity exercise per week for the average adult. This recommendation is based on keeping the heart healthy and strong. If you want to lose weight, you may need to increase the amount and intensity of your exercise.

Remember, some exercise is better than no exercise. You do not have to get in a full 30 minutes of exercise at one time. If your schedule does not allow you to spend that much time exercising at once, break it down into smaller segments throughout the day. Ten minutes here or there will make a big difference.

By using tools like Fitbit and MyFitness Pal, you can easily keep track of the calories you consume and the calories you burn on a daily basis, giving you the information and the motivation you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

 

Your Life in Balance


By Betty Murray

The types and amounts of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins you take in on a daily basis matter. But ultimately, what matters when it comes to weight loss and weight management is calories. Balancing how many calories you take in with the number of calories your body burns is the secret to losing weight and keeping it off.

What’s your caloric balance? If you are maintaining your current weight, you are consuming about the same amount of calories your body is using. If you are gaining weight, you’re in caloric excess, which means you’re consuming more calories than your body is burning. If you are losing weight, it means you’re in caloric deficit, and eating fewer calories than your body is using.

When the body is in caloric deficit, it begins to pull stored fat from cells in the body to use as energy, thus reducing the amount of fat in your body and decreasing your weight.

How many calories should I consume?

Keep in mind that one bound of body fat is equal to approximately 3,500 calories. Start by keeping a food journal and writing down all the foods and drinks you consume each day. This will help you have a better understanding of how many calories you’re consuming on a daily basis. Also keep track of your daily physical activity and the length of time you do it.

Not sure how many calories you’re eating or how many you’re losing through exercise? MyFitnessPal is a great free resource to track your food and exercise to find out if you are in caloric balance. MyFitnessPal will also show you the nutrients that are in your food, so you can easily see if you are getting enough vitamins, minerals, protein, etc.

A Fitbit is another tool you can use to help you stay motivated by tracking your physical activity. Fitbit will sync with MyFitness Pal to give you an accurate picture of your daily calories in/calories out.

How much exercise do I need?

The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes (30 minutes, five days a week) of moderate intensity exercise per week for the average adult. This recommendation is based on keeping the heart healthy and strong. If you want to lose weight, you may need to increase the amount and intensity of your exercise.

Remember, some exercise is better than no exercise. You do not have to get in a full 30 minutes of exercise at one time. If your schedule does not allow you to spend that much time exercising at once, break it down into smaller segments throughout the day. Ten minutes here or there will make a big difference.

By using tools like Fitbit and MyFitness Pal, you can easily keep track of the calories you consume and the calories you burn on a daily basis, giving you the information and the motivation you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.