Be Well launching events in October

The Be Well Membership is re-vamped, re-created and re-designed

 just for YOU!!


Self-care may not sound sexy but it’s essential and a priority for quality living, well-being and your health.
We have re-vamped our Be Well Membership and have created several exciting events to share how you can incorporate Lifestyle Medicine into your life. You can live with less stress, more contentment, more joy, more passion, more energy and more engaging relationships.
We want to help you arrive at your definition of what would make your life tick from the inside-out in your Mind, Body and Spirit. We’ve focused our program on Mood, Food, Movement, Healing Touch, Life & Creativity.
So, if you need to add a little pizazz into your life and keep it there; we believe we have the answer. You + Be Well = Optimal Living. Our team of veteran experts will be alongside you every step of your personal journey.

Join our Be Well team in the month of October for one of the following events and get introduced to our new program and it’s benefits.

Tues 10/20 @ 6:30PM – 8PM
Be Well in Your Mind, Body & Spirit Panel
FREE – you must hold your space though; call the office to register
All of the providers that help you with FOOD, MOOD, LIFE, HEALING TOUCH and CREATIVITY will be on the panel.  They will share their philosophy of care, what typical appointments are like, give you insight into why they do what they do and who and how they can help.  Also, to be discussed are the benefits of that service/treatment regimen to your specific situation or condition. Then, we’ll open it up for questions. Then, you will be presented with savory options for your health.
Saturday Educational Event –
Sat 10/24 @ 10-11:30am
Be Well in Your Relationships with Jenny
FREE – you must hold your space though; call the office to register
A more in depth look at relationship and marriage coaching; a field not to be feared but to embrace if you want to see change in all of your relationships. She will share the 7 Key Values to a Great Relationship and the Layering Triangle of Love she takes clients through.
Then, she will open it up for questions. Jenny will also share some special recipes for LOVE and appealing sexy offers for your relationships. Remember, the MOST important relationship of LOVE to embrace is with YOURSELF. This will be a core theme expressed.
Celebrate our 10th Year Anniversary at our Gratitude Wine and Cheese Party 
at Living Well –
No Whining; just Live Well with the Be Well Membership
Thursday, 11/5 @ 6:30-8:30pm
Come mix, mingle, talk to our providers, see our place and hear about all of the details of the new membership.
We’ll have mini-talks, cool door prizes, great gluten free snacking and of course lots of meeting on interesting people. We couldn’t do this celebration without you. You are the reason we’ve been in business for 10 years!

Join us for a Healthy Happy Hour on Tuesday, November 10th
Surviving the Holidays Panel – Don’t be a GRINCH or How to Deal with One”
2:00PM -6:00PM – Try On Sessions (20 min each – Try on one or more of our Be Well Circle Services)
6:30PM – 8PM – Panel discussion


 

Meet the New Be Well Membership Team 2015

Sarah Ferguson, MABC
Life Transitions and Grief/Loss Coaching
 
Kaelyn Pehrson, Certified Health Coach & Wholeistic Kinesiologist
From whole food cleanses, numerous delicious recipes, the right eating for you, and meeting your physical health goals; she’s your girl
 

Jessica Blue Sky Vigil, LPC
Creative Counselor with specialty in getting grounded in yourself through
 innovative outlets like art, nature, & breath work
 

Brenda Briscoe, LMT, Bowen Practitioner, LED Light Therapist
Brenda specializes in healing the body from pain, discomfort to live a life full of joy. She specializes in chronic pain from a variety of conditions; she has a passion for migraines, chronic fatigue, neuropathy, digestive issues and more.

“What the FODMAP?” class at Living Well 7/14

“What the FODMAP?”


Tuesday, July 14th
6:30PM – 8:00PM
Cost for class is $20, RSVP now by calling 972-930-0260
— Space is Limited! — 

Attendees will receive recipes, the How-To’s for a Gluten-Free/FODMAP living protocol, a set of the BeFree! Life Affirming Cards and a Self-Test

Join Jenny Bair as she shares “What the FODMAP?!”

No, it’s not something the young kids are saying; it’s a diet that many try when they have gone Gluten Free but still are not feeling stellar.

If you live with typical IBS symptoms, want to eat low in sugar (fructose), eat low/lactose free, lower in yeast, then this diet may be for you!

Betty Murray of Living Well has shared the science behind the diet but Jenny Bair, MHE, of Living Well Dallas is going to help you logistically get your head around it and spell out the how-to’s for the everyday living.

She’ll share her top ten list of products that she uses as go-to’s, she’ll give you a summer meal and some snack recipes to take home with you, and just give you hope for feeling better and better each day.

Jenny is an expert in how to make lasting changes in your life and she loves navigating the unseen space in between your ears to figure out how to “Work with yourself and not against yourself.”

So, get yourself and your friends to this class. You’ll leave with a refreshed sense of enthusiasm of why you make all of the efforts to live the way you do with wonderful pay-off’s.

You’ll also get to  taste test sample some of the snackie type recipes in her new “What the FODMAP?” cookbook and she will keep you entertained as she is known for her honesty, interaction and  “life stand-up comedy” rolled into her speaking and teaching.

 

Be Free Spirited Living

“I refresh my mind, body and spirit by taking a walk in the sunshine.”

From Jenny Bair:

I designed this Be Free! system starting with the Life Affirming Cards of 52 Weeks/365 Days to give people support for living life with some grace, ease, humor and fun using positive affirmations with A-C-T-I-O-N oriented tips and techniques on the back of re-usable card secured with an open clasp ring.  Over 90% of visits to the doctor can be boiled down to too much STRESS.  So, what are most people seeking in their personal and professional realms? Relief from the pressures of life and too much work, tactics to relax, strategies to connect with others in a simple, easy way that doesn’t take too much effort or thought beyond the already over extended To-Do list. The Be Free – Ignite Your Life System can help you reach your goals in the well-being related areas of your life such as: Physical, Social, Mental, Emotional, Spiritual, Organizational, Cooking, Sensuality, Life Admin and Creativity & Fun.   There are several ways to capture the Be Free message each week.  You can use the system by yourself weekly and or daily by using the cards as a visual cue to create some “space” mentally each week within the presented topic.  Utilize the private Be Free social media group to gain some community support.  Engage in one on one coaching in person at Living Well Dallas, by phone or Skype.  Any combo of the above. Even though the cards say gluten free living; this program applies to any person living a busy lifestyle.  Many of our clients like to also engage in detoxing their bodies too by using the Cleanse book, written by Betty Murray, the co-author of Be Free cards and my business partner.

So, the bottom line is to seek support at the level in which you need it and the best way it fits into your day.  So, my encouragement is to watch the weekly video (on Facebook) and review the Be Free weekly tips to help keep a focus on your mind for the week. Use what works; leave the rest behind. I have the motto with my clients, “Work with yourself and not against yourself.” I hope you have a great week!

 

 

 So, Step 1: Watch the video on Facebook — www.facebook.com/livingwelldallas/videos/10153901645462892/?hc_location=ufi

Step 2:  Read over these quickie life ideas to see what might work for you

Step 3:  Try one or more of the ideas on for size and see what happens to your mood, your interactions with others and how you feel about yourself & goal at the end of the week

 

Some ideas to try for this week’s concept:

-Take a walk of 20 minutes or more to increase your brain neurotransmitters and your Vitamin D levels

-Color for 20 minutes in a coloring book or a mandala book to increase better mood and decision making abilities

-Create art for 20 minutes or more

-Decide on your shifts during the day and how you will implement short breaks to refresh, get grounded, relieve stress throughout the day in 5-15 minute increments

 

If you are ready to get started to Ignite Your Life by Being Free, then contact our office to purchase your set of cards at $17.99 or the Be Free-Cleanse Combo at $24.99 or start coaching to get some guidance for life, love and your career to point you in the direction of your dreams and goals. To work with Ms. Bair, MHE, COO, contact our office at 972-930-0260.  See more on our website at: www.livingwelldallas.com.  I’ll see you next week.

 

 


Jenny Bair, MHE, COO is the Co-Founder of Living Well Health & Wellness Center.  She is a Born Leader, Speaker, Author & Coach.  Jenny “Crafts Extraordinary Lives and Careers through Creativity, Resiliency & Deliberate A-C-T-I-O-N”. 

 

Connect with Jenny on Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/jennybair

Be Friends on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LivingWellJennyBair

What the FODMAP? On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/What-the-Fodmap-Supporting-those-on-a-GF-IBS-diet-or-Fodmap-diet/550902631643042

The Essentialist’s Private Group on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/979685472049930/

Living H.O.T.T. Marriage, Parenting & Intimacy on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarriageReVampCamp

Jenny’s Pure Romance on Face Book for those 18 and over: https://www.facebook.com/JennyBairPureRomance

Jenny’s Professional Organizing Team on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/livingwellprofessionalorganizers

Living Well Inc. on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/livingwelldallas

Living Well Inc. on You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDj4theDWtqcKywiVtjLLBA

Healthchat on You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfy7xfKxqdMAAsmfCYrXrbg

Healthchat on Google+:  https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/104196110677506440582/104196110677506440582/posts/p/pub

DoTerra Essential Oils Site: http://www.mydoterra.com/befreejennybair/#/

Jenny & Living Well on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/gogod123/

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals

Eating Clean in 2015: Your Guide to Clean Diets

By Betty Murray

You’ve probably heard about clean eating, but what are clean diets really all about?

A clean diet is one that is less focused on calorie count, and more on the kind of food you put into your mouth. “Clean” foods are the best and healthiest foods available, such as organic fruits and veggies, whole grains, and healthy proteins and fats. Eating clean means cutting back on processed and refined foods, sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats.

Another way to look at eating clean is by focusing on eating “real” foods. Eating foods in their most natural, whole state is the best way to eat clean. As a general rule of thumb, you can’t find it in the outside aisles of the grocery store, it’s probably not considered “clean.” Unlike other diets, eating clean does not require you to cut out an entire food group; it’s simply about making the healthiest choices within each food group.

By eating clean, you are eliminating additives and preservatives that contribute to both illness and weight gain.

Tips to eat clean

Ready to start cleaning up your diet? Here are a few tips:

• Avoid processed foods. Read the ingredient label on the back of any food you buy (better yet, buy whole foods that are the ingredient themselves, rather than foods that require a label). If you do purchase packaged foods, steer clear of any foods with a long list of ingredients or ingredients you cannot pronounce. Processed foods are also the source of most of our excess calories, fat, sugar, and salt. By cutting out processed foods and eating real foods instead, you’ll also reduce your intake of sugar, salt, and fat.

• Eat more fruits and veggies. Fresh, organic produce is the foundation of a clean diet. Fruits and vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients you need for a healthy body. Vegetables are low in calorie, and high in fiber, helping you feel full longer.

• Stick to healthy fats. Cut your intake of saturated fats and stick to healthy fats instead. When cooking, use extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil instead of vegetable oil. Healthy fats help to raise the HDL (good cholesterol) while lowering LDL (bad cholesterol). Healthy fats are also found in avocado, nuts, and fatty fish like salmon.

Watch what you drink. Eliminate sugary drinks (even diet sodas) from your diet, and cut back on alcohol. One alcoholic drink (wine, liquor, or beer) per day for women and two for men is generally acceptable on a clean diet. Mixed drinks, however, contain large amounts of suger, so stick to wine, liquor, or beer instead.

• Eat whole grains. If you are going to eat grains, be sure you are eating whole grains, rather than refined grains. Whole grains have more nutrients and still contain the bran and germ, unlike refined grains. Other non-wheat options of whole grains include quinoa, oats, and brown rice.

• Eat less meat. You don’t have to cut meat out of your diet altogether, but you should reduce the amount of meat you eat on a daily basis. A healthy serving of meat is just three ounces (many restaurant portions are three to five times this size!) When eating meat, it’s also important to look for organic, grass fed meat, as this will contain fewer antibiotics and chemicals than other meat.

Eating clean isn’t difficult, but like any diet, it does require diligence. Eating clean can be hard work as it almost always requires preparing a meal at home, rather than enjoying a ready-made meal. Use these steps to get started on a clean diet in 2015.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals