Wellness Events Begin Monday March 13!

For you, your friends and your honey are all welcome to experience these special experiences to help you get back to yourself in all areas of your life in an inventive, creative, healing way. 

Magical Marriage & Relationship Mondays

Do you desire more meaning, connection, intimacy & separation of household chores/organization in your relationship?  Then, please feel free to take the time for you, your honey, and the health of your household by exploring deeplove. deeplove and SYMBIS (Saving Your Marriage Before It Starts & Re-marriage) are both in the form of assessments taken by the couple, books with homework and individual couple coaching sessions. Jenny Bair, MHE, has several packages to help you and your love make your heart’s desires happen. It’s best to start with a 15-minute phone consult and she guide you to the best option for you or you and your love.  All sessions can be done in person, via phone or zoom. So, set up your phone consult today by calling 972-930-0260.  So, when you sign up for any sessions or packages on a Magical Monday; you’ll receive a special gift of a “Spicy Passion” essential oil blend made by Jenny.  She offers day and evening appointments on Magical Mondays for your convenience. These services are best for the serious daters, pre-engaged, engaged and married couples.

 Read more about Jenny’s marriage coaching services here:

About

Total Immersion Education Tuesdays

We set aside free or very reasonable educational events with all of the providers at Living Well Health and Wellness on Tuesday evenings.  So, stay tuned with the newsletter and our social media to see what the latest and greatest topics and speakers will be offering you. 

Wellness Wednesdays 

Several practitioners are offering special rates on popular services for Wellness Wednesday. This is a chance to experience something new!  We encourage you to take time for your personal well-being every day at Living Well. Wellness Wednesdays makes that easy.  We look forward to seeing you make time for yourself, body, mind and spirit.

 

 

 

Adipokines and Cytokines of Fat Burning: Small But Important Molecules

Most people have been getting dietary advice all wrong. Eat less, move more works only for some people for a period of time, but it is not solid long-term dietary advice. Low carbohydrate diets again and again show greater weight loss, increase in HDL, reduction in blood pressure, resolving diabetes and metabolic syndrome and also reduce risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer in numerous studies. So why do we still give the wrong information? In the next few articles, we will look at how the body becomes fat and the best performing dietary change for weight loss: a low carb/high fat diet.

In the previous article, we took a look at the hormones of fat burning, including: insulin, glucagon, ghrelin, and others. Adipokines and cytokines are two hormone-like messengers made by fat cells. Though they are not hormones, they act similar to hormones in that they are released by cells and affect the behavior of other cells.

Adipokins — incluing leptin, adiponectin, LPL, and HSL — are secreted by adipose tissue (fatty tissue) and can play a central role in the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease associated with obesity.

Leptin Leptin is an adipokine made in the fat cells. Normally, leptin rises with feasting and falls in fasting. The fall of leptin signals to the brain…‘time to burn fat!’ In insulin resistance, leptin levels remain elevated. When leptin stays high, the brain thinks the person is eating, so glucagon is inhibited.

Adiponectin Adiponectin regulates glucose and fat levels with insulin. Obese people have lower blood levels of adiponectin than normal weight individuals. Reduction of obesity increases adiponectin levels. Adiponetin enhances your muscle’s ability to use carbohydrates for energy, boosts your metabolism, increase the rate in which your body breaks down fat, and curbs your appetite. Adiponectin, the fat-burning hormone, is insulin sensitive meaning insulin levels must be low in order for adiponectin to take fat across the cell wall to burn. Low adiponectin levels are more strongly associated with the amount of visceral fat (belly fat) than subcutaneous fat (fat in the thighs or buttocks).

Lipoprotein Lipase Also known as LPL, lipoprotein lipase is regulated by feeding/fasting, insulin, and exercise. If insulin is elevated, such as after a meal, LPL is expressed more on the fat cells than on the muscle cells, particularly if the individual is insulin resistant and eats a meal that is high in carbohydrates. LPL receptors take fat from the blood stream into the cell. If insulin levels are low, as in the case of low carb diets, the LPL is expressed more on the muscle cells than on the fat cell and the fat is more readily burned before being stored as fat.

Hormone Sensitive Lipase Hormone sensitive lipase, or HSL, dismantles triglycerides in the fat cells to take the fat molecule across the cell wall into the blood to be burned. High levels of insulin in the body inhibits HSL from doing its job.

Once we have too much fat, we also get “angry fat” that produces inflammatory messengers (Cytokines) that increase fat storage and disease risk. We’ll take a closer look at cytokines in the following article.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post Adipokines and Cytokines of Fat Burning: Small But Important Molecules appeared first on Betty Murray.

Fat Burning 101: The Hormones of Fat Burning

Most people have been getting dietary advice all wrong. Eat less, move more works only for some people for a period of time, but it is not solid long-term dietary advice. Low carbohydrate diets again and again show greater weight loss, increase in HDL, reduction in blood pressure, resolving diabetes and metabolic syndrome and also reduce risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer in numerous studies. So why do we still give the wrong information? In the next few articles, we will look at how the body becomes fat and the best performing dietary change for weight loss: a low carb/high fat diet.

In our first article, we talked about insulin and how insulin levels affect weight gain. Insulin isn’t the only hormone related to fat gain/fat burn in the body. Let’s take a look at several of the hormones that are at work in your body helping you burn or store fat.

Insulin Insulin affects your ability to actually burn fat even if your fat cells are releasing fat into the blood stream. If your insulin levels are even mildly elevated, your body will essentially cannibalize muscle by taking it to the liver to convert to glucose to use as fuel, rather than using stored fat as fuel.

Glucagon — When insulin and leptin (another hormone related to weight gain and weight loss that regulates fat storage) are low, glucagon is released from the pancreas to keep glucose levels in the blood stable during fat burning. Essentially, glucagon and insulin take turns managing the fuel needed for your body to live.

Cholecystokinin (CCK) CCK is a hormone that is released from the cells in your intestines whenever you eat potein or fat. CCK communicates tells your brain that you are satiated while simultaneously working with your stomach to slow the rate of digestion. The end result is that you feel fuller longer.

Ghrelin Ghrelin is produced in your stomach and works with your brain to signal that you are hungry. Reducing calories, in an effort to lose weight, causes an increase in ghrelin. Even after 12 months of a reduced-calorie diet, research shows that ghrelin levels stay elevated. In other words, your body never adapts to eating less and constantly sends the “I’m hungry” signal.

Epinephrine The “fight or flight” hormone, epinephrine drives the burning of fat and its release for energy in the body. Epinephrine can also aid in appetite suppression.

Growth Hormone Growth hormone interacts with fat cells directing them to break down and burn stored fat for energy. Growth hormone can be increased through intense exercise like weight lifting, intervals or circuit training and sleep.

In our next article, we’ll take a look at adipokines and cytokines, two molecules made by fat cells that affect the behavior of other cells. Stay tuned!

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post Fat Burning 101: The Hormones of Fat Burning appeared first on Betty Murray.