Brenda Briscoe

Migraine Recovery with Brenda Briscoe, Bowen Therapist


 

Brenda Briscoe is a Licensed Massage Therapist with over 16 years of experience.  She has an additional certification in Clinical Massage Therapy, as well as Bowen Technique (BowTech) and Neuro-Structural Integration Technique (NST).  Both are versions Bowen Therapy and work toward permanent resolution of pain syndromes. Originated by Tom Bowen of Australia about five decades ago, this work is now becoming more recognized in the U.S. It is known for its consistency in bringing phenomenal results. Brenda is one of very few therapists in the DFW metroplex who are accomplished in this modality.

Another tool Brenda uses is LED light therapy which increases circulation as it reduces pain and swelling.  With this offering, in addition to her Bowen work, she now specializes in Migraine Recovery and has had much success with this condition over her career.

Brenda is offering a FREE 30-MIN CONSULTATION for new clients who want to see if Bowen and LED Light Therapy (phototherapy) is a good fit for them.   A 10 min demo of Bowen therapy and a 10 min demo of light therapy will be provided in this in person consultation.  Schedule your consultation today by calling the Living Well Dallas office at 972-930-0260. Brenda’s techniques are often understood better by experience than description.

LED Light Photo

The Benefits of LED Light Therapy for Fibromyalgia – Free Event

Join us as we explore the mystery that is Fibromyalgia, presented by Brenda Briscoe and Beeben Russell, and hear a compelling solution to the pain it causes.  Learn how LED light therapy (photobiomodulation) can improve this condition and others.

When – Saturday, August 1st from 10:30AM – 12PM.
Hosted in the lobby of Living Well Dallas.

144330 Midway Rd. Ste 121, Bldg 1, Suite 121
Dallas, TX 75244

You may register for this free event by calling Living Well at 972-930-0260.  Registration requested, but not required to attend.

Please, Bring a Friend or loved one who may also benefit from this event.

Health Chat now on Blog Talk Radio

Living Well Dallas is proud to announce

Jenny Bair’s new Blog Talk Radio

 

 

Ms. Bair, MHE will be interviewing the leading experts on topics relating to Food, Life and Love. Get your burning questions answered and get tips to LiveFULLY and Be Free!  Check out Jenny’s Health Chats at www.blogtalkradio.com/healthchat!

 

 

Mood Elevation

Do you want a mood Elevation?
Are you feeling passion-less?
At moments hopeless and unsure?
Diffusion, inhalation or application of this oil in a carrier oil might help your existing Mood Management Plan.
 

 
Speak with Jenny Bair or Billie Lyde at our practice to learn more about the DoTerra mood oils.
 
If you need more help in getting a Mood Management Plan in your life then, LWD has oils, supplements, shakes, lab testing for brain nuero-transmitters and food sensitivites, dietary plans, medication, coaching, counseling, light therapy and more to help keep you balanced in a way that works for your values, lifestyle and body chemistry. There’s no need to suffer; find new ways to ELEVATE!!
Call 972-930-0260

Spring Specials: Counseling with Jessica Bluesky Vigil

Question: Dear Living Well Counselor,
Spring time marks allergies and productiveness for me, usually. But lately, I have been bothered by something and it’s causing moodiness and spikes in energy – I’m busy as a bee then totally tuckered out. I am feeling more stress than usual. Any quick tips to help?

 Answer: Allergies are extremely challenging and I personally know that condition alone causes stress. It also sounds like you have a bit of old drama coming back around (meaning something emotionally distressing that you are struggling to effectively cope with).  No matter what’s got you feeling “itchy” for some peace of mind you don’t need tons of time to reduce your stress. I recommend taking a mere 5-10 minute chunk of your day and setting it aside to deliberately and mindfully practice self-care. What you choose to do in the time is all up to you but please refrain from phones, emails, and internet related activities. Instead, make a delectable drink, plant a flower, clip nice pictures from a magazine, sing and sway to an uplifting song or try one of the suggestions in this article http://wellgal.com/25-natural-holistic-ways-boost-immunity/. Stay fully engaged in the activity of your choice and if unpleasant or stressful thoughts come into your mind during this time imagine you are GENTLY blowing them away as if they are in a bubble. Inhale through your nose and exhale, nice and slow, through your mouth.

Explore time away from your regular day. RENEW YOU.

 Jessica’s Special Spring Offer:

Because Living Well’s Mission includes assisting people in gaining optimum living and well-being we offer you, our loyal Newsletter recipients, a special Spring Thing – entitling you to a complimentary RENEW YOU session with Jessica Blue Sky Vigil, LPCi.  To schedule your appointment please contact us at 972-930-0260 and mention this offer. Offer expires when Summer begins (June 21st, 2015).

Wellness = Wholeness

Your physical, mental and spiritual health are connected, influencing each aspect of your whole-self. Let’s discuss many factors in your life that contribute to your wellness and create a StressLESS Action Plan.

More than “the couch”

My approach as a counselor includes the traditional “come on in, sit on the couch and tell me about it” confidential atmosphere infused with eco-conscious creativity. Options you’ll have in your journey of healing include clinical counseling, meditation, artistic creation, theatrical release of emotions, solution focused stress relief and more.

 Call today and schedule a 20 minute FREE phone consultation with Jessica directly. 972-930-0260

Jessica Blue Sky Vigil

 

Tina Rios

Living Well Dallas Skin Therapy – Meet Tina Rios

Meet Tina Rios!!!!

Our new full-time Esthetician 

Tina Rene Rios, LSO/Senior Laser Professional/Licensed Esthetician is a Dallas native with over 8 years experience in the cosmetic field.  She has a background in running a center and also being a clinician.  Tina offers laser hair reduction, skin rejuvenation, weight reduction through the ZEN Balance machine, body contouring through the TORC machine, many types of facials and wraps to achieve immediate and long-term results for her clients.  She is dedicated to educating her clients on the treatment options and patient satisfaction is of the utmost importance to her.  Tina is a member of the National Women’s Professional Association, and donates to the Pushington Post and SPCA of Texas.  Tina loves to travel, her family, helping people and loves her pets, Daschund, Henry and her cat, Diddy.

Exercise For The Ages

By Betty Murray

Staying active throughout your life is important, but exercise becomes even more important as you age. Many health conditions are associated with age, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and colon cancer, but being physically active can lower your risk of developing these and other health issues.

Whether you are 25 or 65, your exercise program should include aerobic activity (cardio), strength training, and stretching — how you accomplish each of these may change with age. Here is your guide to exercising in your 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s+.

Exercise in your 20s

Your body is strong and resilient during your 20s, so take advantage of that and be willing to explore new forms of exercise. Shoot for 45-60 minutes of moderate-intensity cardio exercise four to six days a week, being sure to alternate between different types of activities. Add strength training in at least once or twice each week to build your bone and muscle strength, which will naturally begin to decline when you hit 30.

Exercise in your 30s

During your thirties is when you will probably begin to notice signs of aging, such as weight gain, or that it takes you longer to recover from strenuous activity, injury, or even illness. Strength training, cardio, and stretching are all important, and you should vary the different kinds of exercise you do each day to ensure your body is getting all three. Your 30s is a great time to participate in team games such as dodge ball, ultimate Frisbee, or a community soccer league. If you enjoy being active with others, take advantage of that now, while you are still less prone to injury and have more strength and power than you will when you are older.

Exercise in your 40s

If you have lived a lifestyle of inactivity most of your life, your 40s is when you will start to reap the consequences of unhealthy habits. Cancer, heart disease, and diabetes are on the rise among middle-aged adults.

During your 40s, strength training isn’t just something that’s good to do, it’s something you must be doing. Think of it as a “use it or lose it” scenario. Without regular strength training, muscular performance declines after age 40. If you want to maintain your muscles as you age, strength training must be a priority. Strength training will also help keep your bones strong and help you avoid frailty when you are older.

Regular stretching is also more important now than ever before. Yoga and Pilates are great forms of exercise for both strengthening and stretching your muscles.

Exercise in your 50s+

These are the golden years of life, as you will enjoy the fruits of all of your labor. You want to be strong and healthy for your grandchildren, so don’t let exercise slack just because you’re getting older. For women, menopause often begins in this decade, and that can mean an increased risk of bone loss, osteoporosis, heart disease, and weight gain.  Weight-bearing exercises can help slow bone loss in middle-aged and older people. Try exercises like stair climbing, tennis, weight lifting, walking, and jogging.

Now is also the time to begin to incorporate balance training into your exercise routine, as balance is often one of the first things to go as we get older. You can practice your balance with simple exercises at home, like standing on one foot while brushing your teeth. Yoga can also help improve balance.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

Exercise For The Ages

By Betty Murray

Staying active throughout your life is important, but exercise becomes even more important as you age. Many health conditions are associated with age, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and colon cancer, but being physically active can lower your risk of developing these and other health issues.

Whether you are 25 or 65, your exercise program should include aerobic activity (cardio), strength training, and stretching — how you accomplish each of these may change with age. Here is your guide to exercising in your 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s+.

Exercise in your 20s

Your body is strong and resilient during your 20s, so take advantage of that and be willing to explore new forms of exercise. Shoot for 45-60 minutes of moderate-intensity cardio exercise four to six days a week, being sure to alternate between different types of activities. Add strength training in at least once or twice each week to build your bone and muscle strength, which will naturally begin to decline when you hit 30.

Exercise in your 30s

During your thirties is when you will probably begin to notice signs of aging, such as weight gain, or that it takes you longer to recover from strenuous activity, injury, or even illness. Strength training, cardio, and stretching are all important, and you should vary the different kinds of exercise you do each day to ensure your body is getting all three. Your 30s is a great time to participate in team games such as dodge ball, ultimate Frisbee, or a community soccer league. If you enjoy being active with others, take advantage of that now, while you are still less prone to injury and have more strength and power than you will when you are older.

Exercise in your 40s

If you have lived a lifestyle of inactivity most of your life, your 40s is when you will start to reap the consequences of unhealthy habits. Cancer, heart disease, and diabetes are on the rise among middle-aged adults.

During your 40s, strength training isn’t just something that’s good to do, it’s something you must be doing. Think of it as a “use it or lose it” scenario. Without regular strength training, muscular performance declines after age 40. If you want to maintain your muscles as you age, strength training must be a priority. Strength training will also help keep your bones strong and help you avoid frailty when you are older.

Regular stretching is also more important now than ever before. Yoga and Pilates are great forms of exercise for both strengthening and stretching your muscles.

Exercise in your 50s+

These are the golden years of life, as you will enjoy the fruits of all of your labor. You want to be strong and healthy for your grandchildren, so don’t let exercise slack just because you’re getting older. For women, menopause often begins in this decade, and that can mean an increased risk of bone loss, osteoporosis, heart disease, and weight gain.  Weight-bearing exercises can help slow bone loss in middle-aged and older people. Try exercises like stair climbing, tennis, weight lifting, walking, and jogging.

Now is also the time to begin to incorporate balance training into your exercise routine, as balance is often one of the first things to go as we get older. You can practice your balance with simple exercises at home, like standing on one foot while brushing your teeth. Yoga can also help improve balance.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

Five Tips to Stay Fit This Fall

By Betty Murray

The more the temperatures drop, many people enjoy spending more time outside, while others tend to retreat indoors. If you’re a warm weather fan, it can be less motivating to get in an outdoor workout, but the cold weather shouldn’t keep you from staying fit in the fall and winter.

Here are a few tips for safe exercising in the cooler temperatures this fall and winter.

Take your workout inside. Go to the mall for a walk and use a pedometer to keep track of your steps. Head to the gym or your local rec center and join an exercise class. Pop in a workout DVD or find a workout guide you can follow at home. The opportunities to exercise indoors really are endless.

• Dress in layers. Wearing layers allows you to stay warm until your body temperature rises enough that you can comfortably remove your outer layers. As your workout comes to an end and you begin to cool down, simply put the outer layers back on. Wear moisture-wicking clothing to keep moisture from sweat away from your skin. Cotton, for example, keeps moisture in, which can keep you from staying warm.

Give cold-weather outdoor sports a try. Though Texas won’t have much in the way of snow for skiing, if you’re traveling to cooler climates, make a point to get out and take advantage of winter sports, such as snow skiing, snowboarding, and ice skating.

Don’t workout alone. No matter the time of day, it is always safest (not to mention it can also be more fun) to workout in a group or with a workout partner. Consider joining a workout club our group, such as a bootcamp-style workout group; or running, cycling, or rowing club. By joining an exercise group, camp, or club, you will likely be working out with a certified trainer or coach, who can help you get the most out of your workout routine. If working out in a group isn’t your thing, find a friend to be your workout buddy, especially if you’re planning to exercise before the sun rises or in the evening. Workout out with others is also a great way to keep you motivated and on track.

• Stay hydrated. Even though it’s cooler outside, it is still important to stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water throughout the day to keep your hydration levels up, and be sure to drink water before, during, and after your workout.

Take advantage of the fall weather before winter hits and exercising outdoors is even more of a challenge. Even if you’re just raking leaves in your yard, find ways to get a little exercise in every day.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.