Wellness Events Begin Monday March 13!

For you, your friends and your honey are all welcome to experience these special experiences to help you get back to yourself in all areas of your life in an inventive, creative, healing way. 

Magical Marriage & Relationship Mondays

Do you desire more meaning, connection, intimacy & separation of household chores/organization in your relationship?  Then, please feel free to take the time for you, your honey, and the health of your household by exploring deeplove. deeplove and SYMBIS (Saving Your Marriage Before It Starts & Re-marriage) are both in the form of assessments taken by the couple, books with homework and individual couple coaching sessions. Jenny Bair, MHE, has several packages to help you and your love make your heart’s desires happen. It’s best to start with a 15-minute phone consult and she guide you to the best option for you or you and your love.  All sessions can be done in person, via phone or zoom. So, set up your phone consult today by calling 972-930-0260.  So, when you sign up for any sessions or packages on a Magical Monday; you’ll receive a special gift of a “Spicy Passion” essential oil blend made by Jenny.  She offers day and evening appointments on Magical Mondays for your convenience. These services are best for the serious daters, pre-engaged, engaged and married couples.

 Read more about Jenny’s marriage coaching services here:

About

Total Immersion Education Tuesdays

We set aside free or very reasonable educational events with all of the providers at Living Well Health and Wellness on Tuesday evenings.  So, stay tuned with the newsletter and our social media to see what the latest and greatest topics and speakers will be offering you. 

Wellness Wednesdays 

Several practitioners are offering special rates on popular services for Wellness Wednesday. This is a chance to experience something new!  We encourage you to take time for your personal well-being every day at Living Well. Wellness Wednesdays makes that easy.  We look forward to seeing you make time for yourself, body, mind and spirit.

 

 

 

More Healthy Fall Foods


By Betty Murray

Daylight Savings Time has ended, Halloween is now behind us and Thanksgiving is just around the corner. With the cooler fall temperatures come some of my favorite fall vegetables. Many people equate fall holidays with weight gain, but there are a number of fall foods that are healthy and rich in nutrients.

As a continuation of my previous article about healthy fall foods, here a few more of my favorite fall vegetables:

Eggplant — Best in the fall, eggplant is an excellent source of phytonutrients, flavonoids (a powerful antioxidant), fiber, manganese, potassium, thiamin, copper, magnesium and vitamin B6. Brush some olive oil on sliced eggplant and bake them, or enjoy them on a grilled sandwich with tomatoes.

Spinach — A dark, leafy green that has health benefits all year round, spinach is packed full of nutrients including flavonoids and anti-inflammatories. Lutien, another nutrient found in spinach is known to help prevent cataracts and certain cancers. Spinach is also a rich source of fiber, vitamins A and C, folate, calcium and magnesium.

Leeks — Weather you sauté them with vegetables, or enjoy them in a bowl of hot soup, Leeks contain many of the same health benefits as onions and garlic. They are also a source of fiber, vitamin C, folate, potassium and calcium.

Beets — Beets contain betacyanin, which is thought to help prevent cancer. Can’t stomach boiled or pickled beats? Try roasting them and serving them as a side dish. Other nutrients found in beets include vitamins A and C, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, folic acid and iron.

Carrots — Your mom wasn’t lying when she told you eating carrots is good for your eyes. Carrots are a rich source of carotenes, which are thought to be good for both vision and skin. They are also high in fiber and a source of vitamins A, B1 and C, riboflavin and niacin.

Shop the local farmer shed at the Dallas Farmer’s Market to find the freshest, organic fall vegetables.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

Healthy fall foods found at the Farmer’s Market


By Betty Murray

Dallas is enjoying a slight drop in temperatures this week, reminders that the sweltering summer heat is over for another year. The fall season ushers in the holidays, which for most people means more parties, more celebrations and more eating.

Eating fall foods doesn’t have to equal weight gain. There are plenty of healthy fall foods that are rich in nutrients. Get out to the Dallas Farmer’s Market and pick up these and your other favorite fall foods:

Squash — Acorn squash, a variety of winter squash, is sweeter than summer squash and is delicious when baked with a touch of fall spice, like cinnamon, ginger or a hint of brown sugar. Acorn squash contains omega-3 fatty acids, which are an essential component of a healthy diet. They are also a great source of vitamin A.

Pumpkin is another type of winter squash. It is also sweet, which is why you so often find it in pies, breads, cakes and cookies. What you may not know about pumpkin is that it is rich in potassium, fiber and B vitamins.

Pomegranates — While they can be difficult to find, the Farmer’s Market is guaranteed to have pomegranates when they are in season (August through December). This tart fruit is high in vitamin C and folate. It’s also a great source of antioxidants.

Brussels sprouts — Don’t turn your nose up just yet, Brussels sprouts contain vitamin K, folate and are an excellent source of iron. If you don’t prefer their flavor, try baking them with a drizzle of olive oil and a few spices, or combining them with balsamic vinegar.

Sweet potatoes — Sweet potatoes can typically be found year around, although their harvest season is September through December. Chances are you’ll get a good dose of sweet potatoes on Thanksgiving Day, probably in casserole recipe combined with a lot of sugar and maybe even marshmallows. Sweet potatoes are packed full of nutrients including vitamin A and iron. They can even act as an anti-inflammatory. Be careful not to combine sweet potatoes with too many other high-calorie ingredients. Roasted or baked sweet potato wedges are a healthy replacement for mashed potatoes or French fries.

Take advantage of these fall foods, especially the variety of winter squashes. Remember, when preparing these foods avoid cooking them with overly fatty or high-calorie ingredients. Many of them have a vibrant flavor, which can be enhanced with a dash of spices.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

Enjoy the State Fair the healthy way: Healthy food options at the State Fair of Texas

By Betty Murray

The State Fair of Texas is off and running, and like any year at the state fair, fried foods rule. An estimated 3 million people will visit the fair this year, many of them to indulge in the newest fried concoction, such as the fried bacon cinnamon roll, fried sugar, chicken fried cactus bites or deep-fried jambalaya.

Simply put, the State Fair of Texas can be the dieter’s worst nightmare. Indulging in deep fried, fatty foods can add hundreds, if not thousands of calories to your daily intake. Granted, few people will return to the fair daily to partake in the fried food fest, but even if your visit to the fair only lasts one day, there are a few healthier options.

The Caribbean Jerk Shack offers a wide range of Jamaican jerk favorites made with original Sadie B sauces. The Jerk Shack is offering vegetarian options such as Jerk Tofu, veggie patties and spinach patties. The Jerk Tofu is grilled with separate tools so the vegetarian foods at the Jerk Shack will never touch non-vegetarian foods.

Learn more about what healthy options the Caribbean Jerk Shack is cooking up at the fair this year in this video from CBS Dallas

Click here to find the Caribbean Jerk Shack on the map of the fair grounds.

Cassie’s Frozen Yogurt is another healthier option for state fair food. If you’ve got a sweet tooth, stop by Cassie’s for a serving of low-calorie frozen yogurt. Cassie’s is located on the Midway.

Click here to find Cassie’s on the map of the fair grounds.

Many vendors offer gluten free options. Look for foods such as roasted corn, fruit cups, tamales, Greek salads, red beans and rice, fresh squeezed lemonade and even gluten free popcorn.

It is possible to enjoy the great State Fair of Texas without ruining your diet. Before heading out to the fair, plan to eat a healthy meal. Going to the fair on an empty stomach may make it more difficult to resist the temptation to indulge in unhealthy, high-calorie fried foods. If you do plan to eat at the fair keep your eyes open for these and other healthy options. Rather than sugary drinks, beer or soda, drink plenty of water.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.