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How A Ketogenic Diet Can Help You Lose Weight

Woman fitness working out exercise health. Isolated over white background

Many people first stumble upon the idea of ketosis while looking for a weight loss strategy. They’ve tried one diet after another, but have found that cutting calories isn’t effective and are in search of something more. When counting calories doesn’t work, a ketogenic diet may be the answer.

Why Calorie Counting Doesn’t Work

Have you been counting calories only to be met with frustration when you aren’t losing weight? One of the reasons calorie-restricted diets tend to fail is because cutting calories increases hunger and food cravings. Cutting calories to lose weight doesn’t suppress your appetite. In fact, it causes your hormones to work against you, by telling your brain to eat more.

Ketosis, on the other hand, is an effective appetite suppressant.

How Ketosis Suppresses the Appetite

Appetite suppression through ketosis happens in more than one way. First, by eating more fat and cutting bad carbs (sugar, bread, etc), your blood sugar will stabilize.

Scientists have found that ketones have an impact on hormones that regulate hunger and satiety. Ketones help to increase production of cholecystokinin (CCK), a hormone, which makes you feel full, and reduce production of ghrelin, which is known as the “hunger hormone.”

After you eat, your intestines release CCK — a powerful regulator of food intake. Your body secretes less CCK after you lose weight. When you are thinner, you will feel less satisfied with the same meal than you did before losing the weight and your cravings for unhealthy foods will increase.

A ketogenic diet for weight loss keeps you from getting caught in this trap.

Ghrelin (a.k.a. “the hunger hormone”) is released from your intestines and stomach and increases hunger. During normal fasting, grehlin levels go up, and when you eat, grehlin drops in response to nutrients circulating in your blood. It goes up during normal fasting. When you eat a meal, ghrelin drops in response to nutrients circulating in your blood.

If you are in a ketogenci state, grehlin levels do not increase with weight loss.

How Much Ketosis Is Enough?

How much ketosis do you need to effectively lose weight? A recent study published in January 2015 in Obesity Reviews found that a blood ketone level of 0.5 mM was sufficient to significantly suppress appetite in participants on a variety of diets. In the average person, circulating levels of ketones are typically at ~0.1 mM after an overnight fast.

Read more about the kegotenic diet in this article.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post How A Ketogenic Diet Can Help You Lose Weight appeared first on Betty Murray.

low testosterone

BioTE Hormone Balancing Seminar – FREE

Join the providers of Optimal Wellness & Hormone Balancing as they discuss how to safely and naturally balance your hormones. 

Did you know a 35 year old female has half the testosterone as a 2o year old female?  Did you know that testosterone deficiency is associated with increased risk of mortality in men?  Hormones are the chemical messengers produced by our glands transported in our blood to our cells, organs & nerves to stimulate them into action.  If we are deficient our bodies lack the set of instructions to defend itself from disease. 

Bring a friend or two and enjoy this informative, interactive, fun, & life changing event. We’ll serve light snacks and drinks.

Space is limited so please confirm your attendance by calling the office at 972-930-0260 or email candy@livingwelldallas.com to let us know you’re coming. Feel free to bring a friend or your partner!

 

 

 

 

Nutritional and Functional Causes for Digestive Complaints

The body requires specific nutrients to function properly. When we don’t get adequate nutrition, our bodies begin to fight back and systems begin to fail. The Standard American Diet (SAD) is generally lacking in nutrient-rich foods, thus the obesity and health epidemics that are sweeping across our nation.

To keep gut function healthy, you need adequate amounts of nutrients including water, magnesium, vitamin C, and fiber to name a few. Just eating too little of these nutrients will lead to slow digestion and constipation.

Fiber — Adds bulk to stools. The USDA recommends 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories consumed. Foods rich in fiber include: beans, berries, and dark, green leafy vegetables like turnip greens, spinach, and Swiss chard. I recommend a minimum of 30g of fiber a day. Fiber also is the food source for your good gut bacteria. When you eat less fiber you grow less of the good probiotics in the gut to keep your immune system and digestive system running smoothly. Nuts and seeds — particularly almonds and flaxseed — are also a great source of fiber. Other high fiber food sources include: kale, cauliflower, broccoli, red cabbage, sweet potato, and many fruits.

Magnesium — Relaxes smooth muscles and increases transit speed of food through the digestive tract. The minimum amount of magnesium you should eat in one day is 300 mg to avoid significant magnesium deficiency. Most people consume far less than that.   To be honest, most people’s nutritional tests show deficiency levels at 600 – 800mg daily. Some of the best sources of magnesium include: dark leafy greens; nuts and seeds (pumpkin seeds are a great source of magnesium!); fish like mackerel, wild salmon, halibut, and tuna; avocado; bananas; and dark chocolate.

Vitamin C — Vitamin C is a vital nutrient for immune function and it acts as a bowel irritant that can increase bowel frequency just like coffee and caffeine. It is recommended that adults consume 65 to 90 mg of vitamin C daily at a minimum. However, many people do not get even the minimum requirement and those with immune system problems, stress and poor gut health may need significantly more up to 2000mg daily in divided dose. Good sources of vitamin C include: red and green bell peppers, kale, broccoli, papaya, strawberries, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, pineapple, kiwi, and mangos.

Other deficiencies may contribute to constipation. Hydrochloric acid (a.k.a. HCl) is a chemical released in the stomach when food is consumed. HCl and other gastric juices work to break down foods causing a release of enzymes to aid in digestion. HCl also aids in fighting infections and supporting the immune system. Too little HCl leads to slow digestion of proteins in the stomach, resulting in reflux and bloat and slowed transit time – constipation. Too much HCl can also cause reflux, increased gastric emptying, and diarrhea.

Additionally, enzymes in the pancreas also help support digestion. A pancreatic enzyme deficiency can lead to delayed digestion of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates leaving the carbs available to the bacteria to ferment, or slowing small intestine breakdown of foods and malabsorption of nutrients and nutrient deficiency and ultimately Small Intestinal Bowel Overgrowth (SIBO). Pancreatic enzyme deficiency can cause a host of digestive symptoms.  A stool test can be instrumental in detecting poor levels of HCL and enzyme production.

To keep your body functioning as it should — particularly the digestive system — you must fuel it with proper nutrients. An appointment with a functional medicine trained nutritionist can help you determine whether or not you are eating the right nutrients, and help you get more of the nutrients your body needs.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

 

The post Nutritional and Functional Causes for Digestive Complaints appeared first on Betty Murray.

Causes of IBS: Allergies, Sensitivities and Autoimmune Reactions

Classic allergy reactions called IgE (immunoglobulin E) can occur under a variety of circumstances and are usually swift, obvious and can cause potentially life-threatening to somewhat debilitating symptoms —“ shock and awe” symptoms.

The sudden reaction is triggered by the IgE antibody binding to the offending object triggering a histamine response, which is the cause of the onset of symptoms ranging from runny nose, sinusitis, earache, or itchy eyes to itching of the skin, eczema, or shortness of breath. In most extreme cases, the immune response can lead to sudden death. Much of the time people with classic allergies know about them because the immune response is rapid and significant.

But the allergic reactions are not always so rapid. Sometimes symptoms of an allergic reaction are delayed, taking hours or days to become noticeable.

Delayed immune reactions or sensitivities can be broken into two types of immune responses. The first type of antibody is called IgG (immunoglobulin G). IgG antibodies can bring on symptoms that are hard to pinpoint because the response may take three hours to three days to become obvious and sometimes you may not be able to absolutely tell you are having a reaction through symptoms but the immune systems still sees that food as an enemy. In some cases the symptoms are vague such as fatigue, headaches, or digestive complaints that come and go or are chronic problems that seem to come and go regardless of what you eat.

IgG mediated food sensitivities are inappropriate immune responses to foods. However, sensitivities are more like the “occupying forces” than “shock and awe.” Sensitivities can often be dose-dependent — a little might be tolerated, but a lot or eating daily can cause prolonged symptoms. The IgG antibody produced during this type of response is the same immune system response we receive to invading pathogens like bacterial or viral infections. IgG antibodies also can cross the placental barrier and give passive immunity to a fetus.

The other immune-mediated response that often leads to delayed complaints is the IgA (Immunoglobulin A) class of antibody responses. IgA antibodies are found in the mucosal areas of the body such as the digestive tract, mouth, lungs, throat and urinary tract.

IgA antibodies are part of our immune system that prevents colonization of pathogens in these areas. This mucosal immune system is a central component of our defense, as a whole, any inflammatory reaction in the gut may results in a condition called Leaky Gut. Leaky gut is the entry of undigested dietary proteins into the blood circulation from damage done to the intestinal lining. Leaky gut can lead to an increase in blood-born IgG antibody reactions to foods.

Non-Celiac Gluten Related Disorders is the term used to describe individuals who cannot tolerate gluten and may experience symptoms similar to those with celiac disease but do not have intestinal damage to the villi as seen in celiac disease. Early research suggests that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is an innate immune response, as opposed to an adaptive immune response (such as autoimmune) or allergic reaction.

Humans are born with an innate immune system. An innate immune response is not antigen specific, meaning that it is nonspecific as to the type of organism it fights — it could be food, bacteria, viral, etc. Although its response is immediate against invading organisms, the innate immune system does not have an immunological memory to invading organisms.

On the other hand, celiac disease is antigen specific and includes antibodies to tissue-transglutaminase, endomysium, and deamidated gliadin antibodies and gliadin antibodies and does result in intestinal damage.

Non-celiac gluten related disorders may share many symptoms with celiac disease. However, individuals with non-celiac gluten sensitivity may also have a prevalence of non-GI symptoms, such as headache, “foggy mind,” joint pain, and numbness in the legs, arms, or fingers. Symptoms typically appear hours or days after gluten has been ingested, a response typical for innate immune conditions like non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

Individuals with non-celiac gluten sensitivity would not test positive for celiac disease based on blood testing, nor do they have the same type of intestinal damage found in individuals with celiac disease. The blood tests may show mild elevations in IgG or IgA antibodies but would not be strongly positive. Some individuals may experience patchy or minimal intestinal damage, and this goes away with a gluten-free diet.

Gluten sensitivities can wreak havoc on your body, especially your gut. As with any food allergies, eliminating offending foods is the only way to prevent an immune reaction causing minor to severe symptoms.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

 

The post Causes of IBS: Allergies, Sensitivities and Autoimmune Reactions appeared first on Betty Murray.

Two Gut Organisms: A Destructive Co-Dependent Relationship

Balance of bacteria and organisms in your gut matters more than you may think. When the bacteria are out of balance you may experience symptoms such as bloating, cramping, gas, belching, constipation and diarrhea.

There are two types of organisms in the gut. One group is bacteria, the other is an archaea—a one-celled organism like a bacteria that also inhabits the gut. An over growth of archaea that produce methane gas causes constipation, while overgrowth of hydrogen sulfide producing bacteria causes diarrhea. Archaea can also cause gastroparesis, a condition in which the signals to the digestive system falter or slow down, thus slowing the digestive processes down.

The Vicious Cycle Inside Your Gut

If you have diarrhea-related Small Intestinal Bowel Overgrowth – SIBO, you are suffering from an overgrowth of hydrogen-producing bacteria in your small intestine. Bacteria produce hydrogen gas as a byproduct of carbohydrate fermentation in the gut. An overgrowth of bacteria also produces toxins that irritate the gastrointestinal lining that causes diarrhea. Most of these toxins overload the TRPV1 receptors in our gut, greatly increasing water concentration and gut movements (peristalsis) that causes diarrhea as a defensive mechanism to protect the body from the toxins and bacteria.

If you suffer from constipation, you likely have an overgrowth of archaea. Archaea in the digestive system feed off of hydrogen that other bacteria produce during the fermentation of carbohydrates in our gut. Archaea then produce methane as a byproduct of their digestion. The more fermentation and hydrogen gas that occurs in the intestines, the more methane archaea will be able to produce. Methanobrevibacter smithii seems to be the most dominant of the archaea species in the gut, compromising at least 90 percent of the archaea gut flora.

Increased hydrogen-producing bacteria and poor lactose absorption have been correlated with an overgrowth of archaea in the gut and gastroparesis (slowing of digestive activities) and constipation. Decreased migrating motor complex function (or MMC, the process by which the digestive system eliminates waste) also leads to an increase of hydrogen (feeds archaea) and methane concentrations in the gut, which causes excessive bloating. People suffering from archaea overgrowth also have significantly lower colon pH, which can help protect the bacterial overgrowth from immune elimination.

How does archaea dysbiosis further hinder MMC function to the point of chronic constipation? Serotonin (5-HT3 / 5-HT4) is one of the biggest neurotransmitters in the gut associated with regulating proper gut function. Lower amounts of serotonin in the gut leads to reduced function and chronic constipation in methane-dominant SIBO. Reduced activation of the serotonin receptors in the ileum greatly slow down both gastric emptying of the stomach, which can cause gastroparesis symptoms, and emptying of the small intestine, which can lead to SIBO.

Stopping the Cycle

Bacteria and archaea in the gut feed off of each other, so how do you stop the back and forth of bacterial or archaeal overgrowth?

Taking a probiotic while following the FODMAP diet (explained in this article) is usually the best way to maintain balance of the gut bacteria. Without testing to determine exactly what your imbalance is, take a full-spectrum probiotic. Reducing FODMAP foods takes away the food source for these bacteria. If your problems are pronounced and doing the diet does not result in symptoms, I recommend seeing a functional medicine practitioner for additional help. Once you’ve achieved balance (are no longer experiencing symptoms), often the FODMOP diet isn’t necessary, though a plant-centric with adequate protein and healthy fat such as the Paleo diet is still recommended. Regular exercise can also help to regulate the MMC function of the gut.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post Two Gut Organisms: A Destructive Co-Dependent Relationship appeared first on Betty Murray.

Be Well launching events in October

The Be Well Membership is re-vamped, re-created and re-designed

 just for YOU!!


Self-care may not sound sexy but it’s essential and a priority for quality living, well-being and your health.
We have re-vamped our Be Well Membership and have created several exciting events to share how you can incorporate Lifestyle Medicine into your life. You can live with less stress, more contentment, more joy, more passion, more energy and more engaging relationships.
We want to help you arrive at your definition of what would make your life tick from the inside-out in your Mind, Body and Spirit. We’ve focused our program on Mood, Food, Movement, Healing Touch, Life & Creativity.
So, if you need to add a little pizazz into your life and keep it there; we believe we have the answer. You + Be Well = Optimal Living. Our team of veteran experts will be alongside you every step of your personal journey.

Join our Be Well team in the month of October for one of the following events and get introduced to our new program and it’s benefits.

Tues 10/20 @ 6:30PM – 8PM
Be Well in Your Mind, Body & Spirit Panel
FREE – you must hold your space though; call the office to register
All of the providers that help you with FOOD, MOOD, LIFE, HEALING TOUCH and CREATIVITY will be on the panel.  They will share their philosophy of care, what typical appointments are like, give you insight into why they do what they do and who and how they can help.  Also, to be discussed are the benefits of that service/treatment regimen to your specific situation or condition. Then, we’ll open it up for questions. Then, you will be presented with savory options for your health.
Saturday Educational Event –
Sat 10/24 @ 10-11:30am
Be Well in Your Relationships with Jenny
FREE – you must hold your space though; call the office to register
A more in depth look at relationship and marriage coaching; a field not to be feared but to embrace if you want to see change in all of your relationships. She will share the 7 Key Values to a Great Relationship and the Layering Triangle of Love she takes clients through.
Then, she will open it up for questions. Jenny will also share some special recipes for LOVE and appealing sexy offers for your relationships. Remember, the MOST important relationship of LOVE to embrace is with YOURSELF. This will be a core theme expressed.
Celebrate our 10th Year Anniversary at our Gratitude Wine and Cheese Party 
at Living Well –
No Whining; just Live Well with the Be Well Membership
Thursday, 11/5 @ 6:30-8:30pm
Come mix, mingle, talk to our providers, see our place and hear about all of the details of the new membership.
We’ll have mini-talks, cool door prizes, great gluten free snacking and of course lots of meeting on interesting people. We couldn’t do this celebration without you. You are the reason we’ve been in business for 10 years!

Join us for a Healthy Happy Hour on Tuesday, November 10th
Surviving the Holidays Panel – Don’t be a GRINCH or How to Deal with One”
2:00PM -6:00PM – Try On Sessions (20 min each – Try on one or more of our Be Well Circle Services)
6:30PM – 8PM – Panel discussion


 

Meet the New Be Well Membership Team 2015

Sarah Ferguson, MABC
Life Transitions and Grief/Loss Coaching
 
Kaelyn Pehrson, Certified Health Coach & Wholeistic Kinesiologist
From whole food cleanses, numerous delicious recipes, the right eating for you, and meeting your physical health goals; she’s your girl
 

Jessica Blue Sky Vigil, LPC
Creative Counselor with specialty in getting grounded in yourself through
 innovative outlets like art, nature, & breath work
 

Brenda Briscoe, LMT, Bowen Practitioner, LED Light Therapist
Brenda specializes in healing the body from pain, discomfort to live a life full of joy. She specializes in chronic pain from a variety of conditions; she has a passion for migraines, chronic fatigue, neuropathy, digestive issues and more.

The Role of Genetics in Weight and Why One-Size-Fits-All Diets Don’t Work: Part 3

Are You Eating the Right Diet for Your Genes?

Since we have established that genetics do in fact play a role in weight gain/ weight loss (see Part 1 and Part 2 of this series), let’s take a look at how this relates to the foods you eat.

Some genetic mutations confer dietary advantages over others. For example, some gene combinations work better with a low carb diet, some with the Mediterranean diet, and others with a low fat diet (this is a small part of the population).

How do genes affect metabolism?

While there is still more to learn on the topic of genetics and metabolism, what we do know is that some people store more energy as fat in an environment of excess, while others lose less fat in an environment of scarcity. In other words, genetics cause some people to burn fat at a higher rate (high metabolism) while others burn fat at a lower rate (low metabolism). These differences are largely due to genetic variations.

How do you know which diet is right for you?

The simple answer: genetic testing. But don’t settle for labs that only test five or six genes. Our bodies have a multitude of gene combinations that we are only just uncovering and testing five or six out of trillions of potential combinations will not be sufficient.

We use Pathway Genomics for genetic testing. To date, Pathway Genomics tests the largest number of genes to determine the proper gene-diet combination.

What foods should I eat?

With or without genetic testing, we know one thing: real foods are packed with nutrients and compounds that can help you lose weight and prevent or overcome a myriad of health problems and diseases. No mater your genetic makeup, here are a few tips everyone should follow:

  • Eat real foods. Stick to whole, unrefined, and unprocessed foods to get the right nutrients—protein, fat, carbs, vitamins, and minerals—you need to stay lean and healthy.
  • Eat a variety of colors. When shopping for produce, choose a rainbow of colors. Different colored fruits and vegetables contain different essential nutrients, so be sure to mix things up and eat a variety.
  • Eat fresh, organic foods whenever possible. Locally grown, fresh, organic foods are the best option, and far better for you than frozen or canned foods.

Want to know what diet you should eat for your genes? Contact us today for genetic testing and nutritional guidance.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

 

The post The Role of Genetics in Weight and Why One-Size-Fits-All Diets Don’t Work: Part 3 appeared first on Betty Murray.

The Role of Genetics in Weight and Why One-Size-Fits-All Diets Don’t Work: Part 3

Are You Eating the Right Diet for Your Genes?

Since we have established that genetics do in fact play a role in weight gain/ weight loss (see Part 1 and Part 2 of this series), let’s take a look at how this relates to the foods you eat.

Some genetic mutations confer dietary advantages over others. For example, some gene combinations work better with a low carb diet, some with the Mediterranean diet, and others with a low fat diet (this is a small part of the population).

How do genes affect metabolism?

While there is still more to learn on the topic of genetics and metabolism, what we do know is that some people store more energy as fat in an environment of excess, while others lose less fat in an environment of scarcity. In other words, genetics cause some people to burn fat at a higher rate (high metabolism) while others burn fat at a lower rate (low metabolism). These differences are largely due to genetic variations.

How do you know which diet is right for you?

The simple answer: genetic testing. But don’t settle for labs that only test five or six genes. Our bodies have a multitude of gene combinations that we are only just uncovering and testing five or six out of trillions of potential combinations will not be sufficient.

We use Pathway Genomics for genetic testing. To date, Pathway Genomics tests the largest number of genes to determine the proper gene-diet combination.

What foods should I eat?

With or without genetic testing, we know one thing: real foods are packed with nutrients and compounds that can help you lose weight and prevent or overcome a myriad of health problems and diseases. No mater your genetic makeup, here are a few tips everyone should follow:

  • Eat real foods. Stick to whole, unrefined, and unprocessed foods to get the right nutrients—protein, fat, carbs, vitamins, and minerals—you need to stay lean and healthy.
  • Eat a variety of colors. When shopping for produce, choose a rainbow of colors. Different colored fruits and vegetables contain different essential nutrients, so be sure to mix things up and eat a variety.
  • Eat fresh, organic foods whenever possible. Locally grown, fresh, organic foods are the best option, and far better for you than frozen or canned foods.

Want to know what diet you should eat for your genes? Contact us today for genetic testing and nutritional guidance.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

 

The post The Role of Genetics in Weight and Why One-Size-Fits-All Diets Don’t Work: Part 3 appeared first on Betty Murray.

The Role of Genetics in Weight and Why One-Size-Fits-All Diets Don’t Work: Part 2

Part 2: Are There Fat Genes?

It is easy to assume that someone who is overweight simply eats too much and/or doesn’t exercise. And while diet and exercise are the primary factors contributing to weight gain, genetics also play a role. Scientists have known for years that there are genes and genetic mutations linked to weight gain and obesity, but until recently, they didn’t know just how those genes affect weight.

FTO Research led by scientists at MIT and Harvard University that was published online this week by the New England Journal of Medicine reveals that a faulty version of FTO causes the body to store energy from food as fat rather than burning it off.

“For the first time, genetics has revealed a mechanism in obesity that was not really suspected before,” said study leader Melina Claussnitzer, a genetics specialist at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

This discovery relating to the FTO gene show that diet and exercise aren’t the only factors that feed into obesity. “A lot of people think the obesity epidemic is all about eating too much,” said Dr. Clifford Rosen, a scientist at Maine Medical Center Research Institute and an associate editor at the New England Journal of Medicine.

According to researchers from the National Institutes of Health, people who carry one or two of the mutated genes (either from one parent or both) have reduced function in their medial prefrontal cortex, a region thought to be important in controlling impulses and response to the taste and texture of food. People who carry one or two copies of this gene are more likely to consume high-calorie, fatty foods as they age.

One study of nearly 700 participants found that about 45 percent of people have at least one copy of the FTO variant, and about 16 percent of people have two copies of the gene.

MC4R — Overeating is largely responsible for overweight and obesity cases in modern society, and this genetic mutation is at least partially responsible for overeating in individuals who carry one or two of the MC4R mutation.

Mutations in this gene account for six to eight percent of obesity cases, and about 22 percent of the population has this mutation, making it the most common genetic cause of obesity. MC4R is responsible for increased appetite and decreased satiety. Carriers of this gene have a tendency to eat larger amounts of food, more fatty foods, and snack more frequently.

The most effective weight loss strategy for people with one or two MC4R variants is calorie restriction through portion control and making smart, healthy food choices.

Even if you are genetically predisposed to be overweight or obese, don’t let that become your excuse. Having one of these genetic mutations doesn’t destine you to become obese. Genetics are not your destiny; they are a propensity. Genetics load the gun; lifestyle, diet, and environment pull the trigger.

etty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post The Role of Genetics in Weight and Why One-Size-Fits-All Diets Don’t Work: Part 2 appeared first on Betty Murray.

Corporate Wellness

Living Well’s Corporate Wellness Division

Are you seeking to create a healthier culture with your work team?  We believe a successful Corporate Wellness program is built of so much more than just a Lunch-n-Learn but it is the first step to progress!

We believe what people need is a comprehensive team

to help them “do Life” with more grace, ease, tools and techniques.

At Living Well Health & Wellness Center, we are experts in Lifestyle Medicine, Prevention and Education. We love helping our clients navigate the day to day logistics of change, staying well, changing their lab numbers, reaching their medical and wellness goals, reducing and dealing with stress in new ways, changing negative thinking, moving their bodies in ways that feel good, helping them find meaning, really changing their state of body, mind, relationships and spirit.

These areas are our specialty.

Your organization can reap these benefits by engaging in customized solutions designed by your company and our Corporate Wellness Director and Consultant, Ms. Jenny Bair, MHE, COO. So, no matter whether the need is small, medium or very comprehensive; she can work with you to assess your needs, streamline activities to leverage your budget, evaluate the success, and/or design a specific membership program that your employees or members can utilize for about the price of

 a medical co-pay.

To change the health status at one company it takes multiple levels of intervention: cultural & policy changes, creation of a Wellness Employee Advisory Board, transperancy, individual changes, and familial changes, incentives & rewards for all not just the uber motivated, mental health time, with of course leadership buy-in and support at all the stages of the process.  It takes a multifaceted approach within the culture itself to impact from what’s inside the vending machines, what food is served in the cafeteria, what types of snacks allowed in the break rooms, bathroom stall education, education on self-care, when to see a doctor/use emergency care and everything in between.

It’s in the company’s best interest if the employee is truly present in all ways not just in their bodies and absentee at the work environment called “presentee-ism.”  This is a huge loss to a company’s efficiency and productivity which equates to the bottom line.  People naturally bring their lives with them to work between their ears and with them everywhere they go. So, there really is power in teaching people how to handle relationships (i.e. communication styles, learning styles, attachment styles, conflict resolution, and crucial conversations) at home and at work as this is where much of their mental energy flows between these two realms for an employee.

Also, through research we know the power of getting the spouse/loved ones and the other family members on board and making the healthy lifestyle changes stick for short and long term. This is why we have created special pricing for adding spouses into the corporate wellness membership plans and educational events that we customize for you.

We are offering our lifestyle medicine, education, and membership packages at a rate we feel confident can’t be beat anywhere in the marketplace with our level of expertise.  We’ve designed a membership program that could fit the needs of the very health conscience, the newbies to wellness, those struggling to keep up with their routines, and those dealing with chronic conditions.

If your company or organization, wants to become healthier from the inside-out then call to set up your 20 minute phone consultation

with Ms. Jenny Bair, to see how the Living Well Corporate Wellness Division can fit your needs, budget and readiness. We can always start with a class and move into larger projects after connection and relationships are built.  Let’s get your organization on its way to optimum well-being!!!

Call 972-930-0260 or email jenny@livingwelldallas.com.