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What Role Does Nutrition Play in Skin Cancer?

39465171 - dermatologist looking at woman's mole with magnifier

Here are five key reasons today’s food contains fewer nutrients than the food of past generations:

1. Monoculture farming (the practice of growing a single crop on a very large scale) over crop rotation has depleted the soil of key nutrients.

2. The Agri-business companies harvest early before the produce has ripened and really assimilated all the nutrients from the soil.

3. Selecting limited food crops for ideal flavor but not variety and nutritional content.

4. More toxins in our food (pesticides, preservatives and even BPA).

5. Environmental chemicals in our air (pesticides, herbicides), skin care, hair products and toothpaste.

Adequate nutrition — including: vitamins, minerals, amino acids, phytonutrients and essential fats like omega 3s — is essential to the body’s detoxifying process. Increased toxin load in our environment and diet means more need for more nutrients. Lack of nutrition means lack of ability to detoxify. Our bodies simply cannot keep up.

When the body cannot keep up with the detox process, toxins bioaccumulate, leading to illness and disease, such as cancer. When we have less nutrition from our food, we have less capacity to detox. According to a study published in Scientific American, “Workers who apply certain pesticides to farm fields are twice as likely to contract melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer…The findings add to evidence suggesting that frequent use of pesticides could raise the risk of melanoma. Rates of the disease have tripled in the United States in the last 30 years, with sun exposure identified as the major cause.” These chemicals are used in the United States on a variety of crops, including nuts, vegetables and fruits.

So could it be that skin cancer is from toxin exposure and the sun is actually helpful. Vitamin D is cancer protective. So therefore, sun exposure without getting burned would be cancer protective.

When you eat food that is low in nutritional value and high in inflammatory Omega-6s and your body is forced to manage toxins we were not designed to detoxify, then your body becomes toxic, and full of free radicals. It becomes inflamed, and acidic which is the prime environment for cancer.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post What Role Does Nutrition Play in Skin Cancer? appeared first on Betty Murray.

Types of Skin Cancer

What is Skin Cancer?

Healthy cells in our body grow and then at a prescribed time, the cell replicates and then dies in a process called apoptosis. Cancer occurs when cells abnormally grow and no longer get the “die” message. Skin cancer occurs when the skin cells begin to abnormally grow. Any abnormal growth of skin cells is considered skin cancer, but only two are considered malignant.

30028564 - an image of a skin cancer detection chart.

What are the Types of Skin Cancer?

There are three primary types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer and is relatively harmless. This type of skin cancer often appears as red patches, shiny bumps or scars. It is estimated that up to 3.0 million cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year. Basal cell carcinoma is usually benign because it rarely metastasizes (spreads) past the original tumor site.

Squamous cell carcinoma is a malignant type of cancer and occurs when upper layers of the skin become mutated and abnormal cells start to grow uncontrollably. Symptoms of squamous cell carcinoma include open sores or scaly red patches that can also bleed or crust. Squamous cell carcinoma has a raised boarder pattern and a small hole in the middle. It’s been reported that 700,000 cases are diagnosed each year resulting in 2,500 deaths.

Melanoma is the most dangerous type of malignant and potentially fatal skin cancer. Melanomas skin cancer symptoms are bumps or patches that resemble moles and are usually black or brown with irregular borders. However, they can be blue, pink, red, white or even skin-colored. If detected early, melanomas are generally curable. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, melanomas “develop when unrepaired DNA damage to skin cells…triggers mutations (genetic defects) that lead the skin cells to multiply rapidly and form malignant tumors.”

The ABCDE’s of Skin Cancer Symptoms

These five keys of skin cancer symptoms can help you recognize skin cancer early.

Asymmetry Moles are usually round in shape. Draw a line through the middle of the mole or lesion on your skin. The two halves should be even or symmetrical. If the mole is not symmetrical this is a sign that the tumor may be malignant.

Border  Non-malignant tumors will typically have a smooth, regular border. The border of an early melanoma will generally be uneven or jagged.

Color A mole has only one color. Melanomas often have color variation of shades of black, brown, and tan. They may also be blue, red and other colors.

Diameter As a rule of thumb, non-malignant skin cancers are smaller than ¼ inch in diameter. Melanomas are usually larger in diameter, so keep an eye on anything that is larger.

Evolving If the mole changes in color, elevation, size, or shape and bleeding, crusting and itching are signs that you should have the mole checked.

Not all cancers fit the ABCDE’s. Other symptoms of skin cancer include: pigmented patches or growths that grow beyond their border, redness, swelling, tenderness, pain or sensitivity in a bump or mole.

It is important to take note of any new skin spots or growths, and consult with your doctor for any moles, freckles, or spots that seem different from the others.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post Types of Skin Cancer appeared first on Betty Murray.

How to Avoid Skin Cancer

 

 

42711397 - sun, face, woman.

Here are the current stats on skin cancer reported in the media:

  • One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime.
  • Almost 90 percent of melanomas can be linked to sun exposure and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, usually from sunburns not just from sun exposure.
  • Regular daily use of sunscreen (SPF 15+) reduces the risk of developing melanoma by 50 percent.
  • One person dies of melanoma every hour.

But are these claims completely true? Skin cancer rates are increasing despite sunscreen use and despite the fact that more people are spending time indoors rather than outdoors. So what gives?

Here are some truths you need to know about skin cancer:

  • The sun does NOT cause skin cancer.According to the British Journal of Dermatology, studies have already disproven this theory as it has been discovered that most skin cancer did not develop from areas or freckles created by sun exposure.
  • We need vitamin D to live, and regular full body sun exposure is the healthiest way to synthesize Vitamin D. Our cannot make vitamin D without sun exposure. According to the Environmental Working Group research: “Every major public health authority — the FDA, National Cancer Institute and International Agency for Research on Cancer — has concluded that the available data do not support the assertion that sunscreens alone reduce the rate of skin cancer.”
  • Many sunscreens are filled with toxic chemicals that have been linked to skin cancer. Even the best sunscreens pose certain risks.

So if sunscreen does not protect against cancer, then what does? The first question we all should be asking is this: is the rise in skin cancer caused by the sun?

Could it be that the changes in our nutrition, diet and foods or environmental factors such as bioaccumulation of toxins from body care products, sunscreen and other pollutants are the real cause of the rise in skin cancer?

The good news is there are many options available to reduce your risk of bioaccumulation of toxins and overall risk. It is first important to know what toxins contribute to skin cancer, what skin cancer is, the five skin cancer symptoms, and natural aids to your skin’s health. These topics will be covered in my next few blog posts. So stay tuned!

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post How to Avoid Skin Cancer appeared first on Betty Murray.

How to Avoid Skin Cancer

 

 

42711397 - sun, face, woman.

Here are the current stats on skin cancer reported in the media:

  • One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime.
  • Almost 90 percent of melanomas can be linked to sun exposure and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, usually from sunburns not just from sun exposure.
  • Regular daily use of sunscreen (SPF 15+) reduces the risk of developing melanoma by 50 percent.
  • One person dies of melanoma every hour.

But are these claims completely true? Skin cancer rates are increasing despite sunscreen use and despite the fact that more people are spending time indoors rather than outdoors. So what gives?

Here are some truths you need to know about skin cancer:

  • The sun does NOT cause skin cancer.According to the British Journal of Dermatology, studies have already disproven this theory as it has been discovered that most skin cancer did not develop from areas or freckles created by sun exposure.
  • We need vitamin D to live, and regular full body sun exposure is the healthiest way to synthesize Vitamin D. Our cannot make vitamin D without sun exposure. According to the Environmental Working Group research: “Every major public health authority — the FDA, National Cancer Institute and International Agency for Research on Cancer — has concluded that the available data do not support the assertion that sunscreens alone reduce the rate of skin cancer.”
  • Many sunscreens are filled with toxic chemicals that have been linked to skin cancer. Even the best sunscreens pose certain risks.

So if sunscreen does not protect against cancer, then what does? The first question we all should be asking is this: is the rise in skin cancer caused by the sun?

Could it be that the changes in our nutrition, diet and foods or environmental factors such as bioaccumulation of toxins from body care products, sunscreen and other pollutants are the real cause of the rise in skin cancer?

The good news is there are many options available to reduce your risk of bioaccumulation of toxins and overall risk. It is first important to know what toxins contribute to skin cancer, what skin cancer is, the five skin cancer symptoms, and natural aids to your skin’s health. These topics will be covered in my next few blog posts. So stay tuned!

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post How to Avoid Skin Cancer appeared first on Betty Murray.

Intermittent Fasting – What You Need to Know

16738924_mWhat is intermittent fasting?

Intermittent fasting is the practice of alternating intervals feeding and fasting. The most popular method of intermittent fasting will be discussed in a later article, but for now, it’s enough to mention that there are differences between fasting methods, length of time of the fasting window and the placement of meals. The fasting period on specific plans can range from 14 hours to 36 hours. Though there are different fasting methods, each specific plan has benefits.

The exception for most people is the time in which we are asleep. When you’re sleeping, you’re fasting. Most people maintain a regular fasting period of six to eight hours per night until their first meal in the morning. The name “breakfast” literally refers to the “break” in the overnight “fast.”

What are the benefits of fasting?

It is commonly taught that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. A study conducted in 2008 suggests that people who eat a calorie-dense breakfast will lose more weight than those who don’t eat breakfast. Authors of the study assumed that eating more calories in the morning results in less snacking during the day, and a reduced daily caloric intake overall.

First, there’s the improved insulin sensitivity that comes with fasting, especially when paired with exercises. More study evidence seems to support the notion that eating breakfast results in a slimmer waistline. There are some epidemiological studies that show a connection skipping breakfast and higher body weight. In fact, insulin sensitivity has shown to be better in those who eat breakfast in studies. I believe this has more to do with adrenal function, stress and hormone balance than the idea of fasting.

There are also hormonal benefits that lead to improved body fat to muscle ratio or body composition. Growth hormone has been shown to increase during intermittent fasting and may offset the effects of cortisol, which can lead to belly fat storage because it increases insulin resistance and fat storage.

This brings us to an interesting question about intermittent fasting. If insulin sensitivity isn’t higher just in the morning and it is really just higher after the eight to 10 hour fasting periods, then insulin sensitivity is higher when glycogen levels are depleted after a fast regardless of the timing of that fast if the liver glycogen will be somewhat depleted.

Generally, intermittent fasting does result in eating less frequently, which tends to result in eating fewer calories overall.

There is also a fascinating anti-aging mechanism of intermittent fasting. When you force the body to use another fuel other than glucose and fat, the body will use its own damaged cellular proteins for energy. When you eat again the cell will use the new nutrients to repair and replace the damaged proteins. This process occurs in short periods of times so the net effect is that the body cleans up cellular debris during a short fast.

But there is a caveat to intermittent fasting. For women, intermittent fasting may not be the panacea that we have all dreamed about. Many women find that when they intermittent fasting leads to sleeplessness, insomnia, anxiety and irregular periods, among a number of other symptoms and disruption of hormones due to the impact of fasting on starvation hormone regulation of leptin, cortisol, ghrelin and insulin. Additionally, women are more finely tuned to respond with physiological changes in relation to perceived starvation.

Intermittent fasting can be a mechanism to assist with optimizing health but it needs to be individualized to each person based on his or her hormonal and physiological stress levels.

Stay tuned for our next article in which we will discuss the different types of intermittent fasting.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.[/fusion_text]

The post Intermittent Fasting – What You Need to Know appeared first on Betty Murray.

Intermittent Fasting – What You Need to Know

16738924_mWhat is intermittent fasting?

Intermittent fasting is the practice of alternating intervals feeding and fasting. The most popular method of intermittent fasting will be discussed in a later article, but for now, it’s enough to mention that there are differences between fasting methods, length of time of the fasting window and the placement of meals. The fasting period on specific plans can range from 14 hours to 36 hours. Though there are different fasting methods, each specific plan has benefits.

The exception for most people is the time in which we are asleep. When you’re sleeping, you’re fasting. Most people maintain a regular fasting period of six to eight hours per night until their first meal in the morning. The name “breakfast” literally refers to the “break” in the overnight “fast.”

What are the benefits of fasting?

It is commonly taught that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. A study conducted in 2008 suggests that people who eat a calorie-dense breakfast will lose more weight than those who don’t eat breakfast. Authors of the study assumed that eating more calories in the morning results in less snacking during the day, and a reduced daily caloric intake overall.

First, there’s the improved insulin sensitivity that comes with fasting, especially when paired with exercises. More study evidence seems to support the notion that eating breakfast results in a slimmer waistline. There are some epidemiological studies that show a connection skipping breakfast and higher body weight. In fact, insulin sensitivity has shown to be better in those who eat breakfast in studies. I believe this has more to do with adrenal function, stress and hormone balance than the idea of fasting.

There are also hormonal benefits that lead to improved body fat to muscle ratio or body composition. Growth hormone has been shown to increase during intermittent fasting and may offset the effects of cortisol, which can lead to belly fat storage because it increases insulin resistance and fat storage.

This brings us to an interesting question about intermittent fasting. If insulin sensitivity isn’t higher just in the morning and it is really just higher after the eight to 10 hour fasting periods, then insulin sensitivity is higher when glycogen levels are depleted after a fast regardless of the timing of that fast if the liver glycogen will be somewhat depleted.

Generally, intermittent fasting does result in eating less frequently, which tends to result in eating fewer calories overall.

There is also a fascinating anti-aging mechanism of intermittent fasting. When you force the body to use another fuel other than glucose and fat, the body will use its own damaged cellular proteins for energy. When you eat again the cell will use the new nutrients to repair and replace the damaged proteins. This process occurs in short periods of times so the net effect is that the body cleans up cellular debris during a short fast.

But there is a caveat to intermittent fasting. For women, intermittent fasting may not be the panacea that we have all dreamed about. Many women find that when they intermittent fasting leads to sleeplessness, insomnia, anxiety and irregular periods, among a number of other symptoms and disruption of hormones due to the impact of fasting on starvation hormone regulation of leptin, cortisol, ghrelin and insulin. Additionally, women are more finely tuned to respond with physiological changes in relation to perceived starvation.

Intermittent fasting can be a mechanism to assist with optimizing health but it needs to be individualized to each person based on his or her hormonal and physiological stress levels.

Stay tuned for our next article in which we will discuss the different types of intermittent fasting.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.[/fusion_text]

The post Intermittent Fasting – What You Need to Know appeared first on Betty Murray.

Can a Ketogenic Diet Clear Up Your Acne?

 

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Though acne is usually seen as a male hormone excess concern called androgen-mediated acne, in many cases it’s actually driven more by insulin, which will also make the other hormonal based acne from thyroid hormones or estrogen issues worse. It directly stimulates skin cells to produce more sebum and keratin but it also increases the secretion and bioavailability of other hormones related to acne.

Insulin affects acne-relevant hormones in these ways:

• Increases androgen secretion.
• Increases androgen bioavailability by reducing sex hormone binding globules (substances that bind to sex hormones and inactivate them).
• Increases IGF-1 bioavailability by reducing IGF-1 binding proteins.

All of these factors contribute to more sebum and more acne.

To date scientists have been reluctant to investigate the connection between diet and acne. However, some studies that show reduction in acne include:

• Reduction of dietary glycemic index (GI).
• Simultaneous reducing dietary glycemic index and increasing protein intake.
• Higher risk of acne in people who drink more milk, likely due to the lactose (a dietary sugar) in cows’ milk.

Acne – Not Just About Insulin

By now it should be clear that insulin is an important factor in acne, but it is certainly not the only factor contributing to acne.

Acne begins with oxidative damage (inflammation) to squalene, a fatty acid in sebum (an oily secretion of the sebaceous glands). Oxidative damage converts squalene into squalene peroxide, which is highly comedogenic, or clogging. Research has quite clearly shown that there can be no acne without initial oxidative damage to sebum.

Sebum oxidation leads to blocked pores, allowing bacteria to colonize in the pores, thus setting the stage for acne.

Insulin stimulates sebum production and increases the proportion of squalene. A reduction in insulin does the opposite. More sebum on your face that is being constantly exposed to inflammatory damage from UV rays, air pollution, toxins, etc, means more acne. Without sufficient antioxidant protection, sebum will suffer oxidative damage resulting in acne.

Clearly there’s a case to be made for using ketogenic diets to treat acne.

That said, not everyone with acne is insulin resistant. In some cases, acne is linked to PCOS or other hormonal abnormalities, while in other cases, it not caused by hormonal issues at all, but has more to do with the gut, lifestyle and stress. In such cases, a low-carb diet may be part of the solution, but repairing the gut and correcting an out of balance lifestyle takes precedence.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post Can a Ketogenic Diet Clear Up Your Acne? appeared first on Betty Murray.

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Upcoming Workshop: Meet the Team

 

Why Your Healing Must Start from the Inside – Learn the 3 Mistakes People Living in Chronic Pain Make, Leave Them STUCK!

 Meet the Team Workshop
with Celia Naple & Jenny Bair
Living Well Dallas – Monday, May 9th from 6:30PM – 8PM

In this introductory talk Celia Naples, CHC will give you tips on how a few small and simple changes to improve your diet can make a big difference in your inflammation and pain.

Imagine being able to walk pain free, getting back to the activities you enjoy. Now imagine that something you do everyday, eating and drinking, can put you on the road to a pain free life.

In this talk Jenny Bair, MHE, COO, will cover how to reduce stress so that your body and mind can heal.

This will be interactive, experiential for your senses and you will leave knowing how to heal from the Inside – out with more peace, laughter and joy!

To register your spot for this incredible night please call 972-930-0260.

The cost will be only $20.00 (a $290.00 value)PRC - Jenny Celia and Bredna

Goitrogens and Your Thyroid

Glasses of fresh organic vegetable and fruit juices. Detox diet. ** Note: Shallow depth of field

A goitrogen is a substance that suppresses thyroid function by inhibiting iodine uptake. Goitrogens get their name because of their tendency to cause goiter, swelling of the thyroid gland.

Some foods can be goitrogenic when they’re eaten in excess, or if the individual has a background of low iodine uptake. Goitrogenic foods include: cassava, which is otherwise known as yucca; soy products; millet; sweet potatoes; cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, bok choy; and most dark leafy greens like kale and mustard greens.

Goitrogens can actually decrease the uptake of iodine in the thyroid gland from other foods that we eat that contain iodine. When eaten regularly (a few times a week), or eaten raw, these foods can impact your thyroid function. Goitrogens interfere with the manufacturing of the thyroid hormone. Even if there’s enough iodine going into the thyroid gland, it can’t be properly utilized and no amount of supplemental iodine — either through food or supplements — will be able to overcome a large intake of goitrogens.

In the case of someone with hypothyroidism, over time, consuming high rates of goitrogenic foods, such as raw kale in green smoothies, can inhibit iodine uptake, actually making their thyroid condition worse.

For the individual with hypothyroidism, kale and collard greens are the biggest offenders. Other green leafy vegetables aren’t as high in goitrogens, and may not have such a severe effect on thyroid function.

Cooking method can also reduce the goitrogen content of foods. For example, steaming foods like kale, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables can reduce goitrogen content by as much as 33 percent, which can make a big difference, especially if these foods are eaten regularly.

Top Goitrogenic Foods

  • Bok Choy
  • Broccoli
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Kohlrabi
  • Mustard and Mustard greens
  • Yucca/Cassava

Goitrogenic activity can be identified through lab testing, watching specifically for conversion of T4 to T3, which would indicate possible goitrogenic activity. Test TSH, T4, and T3 and again after a month to look for any changes in those markers.

Although green smoothies can be very healthy, for the individual with thyroid problems, consuming raw green smoothies every day is not a good idea. Rotating greens and increasing variety in your foods is best. If you do eat green smoothies, watch for a return of thyroid symptoms as a possible sign of excess goitrogens.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post Goitrogens and Your Thyroid appeared first on Betty Murray.

Histamine and Your Thyroid

Red wine pouring into wine glass, close-up

Histamine is an organic compound produced by the body and also present in many foods. Histamine is necessary for the maintenance of life and is involved in immune response. It is released by cells in response to injury and allergic or inflammatory reactions. There are four types of histamine receptor cells (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R). Each receptor influences different systems of the body.

H1R — Correlates with the heart, the skin, respiratory tract and uterus. It affects estrogen, mucus secretion, and vasodilation. Symptoms of histamine responses in HR1 receptors include: tachycardia, arrhythmias, hypo- and hypertension, pruritus (itching), red skin-flushing, urticarial (rash), sinus congestion and rhinorrhea.

H2R Correlates with the cardiovascular system and the gastrointestinal system. Symptoms of histamine responses in H2R receptors include: stomach cramps, diarrhea and leaky blood vessels.

HR3 — Correlates with the central nervous system. Common symptoms of histamine responses in HR3 receptors include: headache, ear ringing, vertigo, nausea, vomiting, insomnia and interrupted sleep, arousal, learning and memory.

HR4 — Correlates with bone marrow, immune cells and mast cell secretion. Mast cells are found in numbers in connective tissue and release histamine and other substances during inflammatory and allergic reactions.

Histamine Foods

Foods that are high in histamine levels include:
• Alcohol
• Pickled or canned foods
• Sauerkrauts
• Matured cheeses
• Smoked meat products
• Shellfish
• Beans
• Nuts
• Chocolates and cocoa based products
• Vinegar
• Ready meals
• Salty snacks or sweets with preservatives and artificial colorings

Histamine Intolerance

A histamine intolerance may signal a thyroid problem. Low thyroid levels can cause an increase in histamine production, whereas high thyroid levels can cause increased histamine receptors and a heightened histamine response.

Histamine intolerance is the result of an imbalance in the body system resulting in a build up of histamine due to the body’s inability to break it down. A healthy person can rapidly detoxify histamine by the enzyme amine oxidases, but in unhealthy or immune-compromised people with low amine oxidase enzymes, the aftereffect is a toxic overload of histamine.

Individuals who have histamine intolerance have diminished diamine oxidase (DAO), the enzyme responsible for breaking down histamine-rich foods. Alcohol and drugs can release histamine into the body and completely block the main enzyme, DAO from doing its job metabolizing histamine, causing symptoms such as diarrhea, headache, hypotension, and arrhythmia. Hives and other skin issues, nasal congestion, and, in extreme cases, asthma attacks may also occur.

DAO enzyme products such as HistDAO from Xymogen, taken with each meal, additional pepsin, vitamin C and B6 can increase the DAO activity and help degrade histamine.

Histamine intolerance causes a condition that many people with autoimmune disease have that’s called “low stomach acid.” Although the symptoms of heartburn and poor digestion are the same as high stomach acid, low stomach acid is a dangerous condition that can contribute to poor vitamin absorption and can lead to very serious problems later on.

Betty Murray, CN, IFMCP, CHC is a Certified Nutritionist & Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the Institute for Functional Medicine, founder of the Dallas-based functional medicine clinic Living Well Dallas and Executive Director of the the Functional Medicine Association of North Texas. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutrition for autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, MTHFR and weight loss.  You can find her book “Cleanse: Detox Your Body, Mind & Spirit” on Amazon here.

Connect with me on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest; I’d love to hear from you!

Want more? Click here to get your free ‘Top 10 Secrets Why You Can’t Lose Weight’ and discover the real reasons you can’t lose weight and what to do about it.

The post Histamine and Your Thyroid appeared first on Betty Murray.