Weight Loss

Kaelyn Photo Smaller

Healthy Lifestyle tips from Kaelyn Pehrson, Certified Health Coach

Daily Morning  with Kaelyn Pehrson, Certified Health Coach

Rise and shine! How you start each morning can set the tone for the rest of the day. My recommendation, start each beautiful day with fresh lemons! By simply juicing a half of an organic lemon into a glass of water, you will discover a simple, yet powerful way to start your day and improve your health. Sound too good to be true?

Those happy yellow citrus fruits are chock-full of health benefits, including high concentration of vitamins B {energy vitamins} and C {immune building}, antioxidants and potassium. What does all that mean for you?

 

* Flushes your system – 

Lemon water aids the bowel in eliminating waste more efficiently, and is a wonderful stimulant to the liver to aid in detoxification.

 

* Balances PH –

Lemon may be thought of as an acidic food, but in the body lemon juice creates an alkaline-forming environment to balance the body’s pH, as well as restore balance by providing vitamin C and high levels of potassium.

 

*Improves Skin –

Lemon juice clears the skin, reduces acne, softens wrinkles, and cleanses excess oils. The vitamin C, citric acid and alkaline properties fight bacteria both internally and on the skin.

 

*Aids in Weight Loss – 

Lemons are high in pectin fiber which help fight hunger cravings. Lemon juice also acts as a natural diuretic and aids digestion.

 

*Immune Building – 

Lemons are high in Vitamin C and potassium. Vitamin C is great for fighting colds and potassium stimulates brain & nerve function.

 

Give it a try. Improving your health does not get any more simple than this! Be sure to juice lemon into warm  or room temperature water, as hot water will destroy the live enzymes.

 

Get Even Healthier!


 

 

Are you curious about how to harmonize your health goals? How to fit wellness into your busy schedule? Let’s chat! Schedule an complimentary 20-minute session today with Kaelyn Pehrson. Call Living Well Dallas at 972-930-0260. 

Together we can work to shift your behavior to develop lifelong healthy habits and a deep understanding of your bio-individual needs. We’ll work together to create lasting changes to your health, energy, and well-being.

Gluten Free Class July 30

Gluten-Free Class 101 – Beyond the Basics
Free Celiac and Gluten Intolerant Educational Class!

 6:30 pm-8:00pm

Gluten Free Class Location

Living Well Dallas

14330 Midway Road, Building 1, Suite 121

Dallas, TX 76244

Learn How Gluten Free may be the solution you are looking for.  Get In-depth Answers to Your Burning Questions about Gluten, Celiac and Gluten Intolerance. What is the difference between Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance? What ingredients do I need to look for to be safe? How do we become sensitive to gluten? Should I consider going gluten free?  Join Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT of Living Well Dallas – Certified Nutritionist and Education Leader for the Gluten Intolerance Group of Greater Dallas for an informative in-depth discussion about going gluten free from what is happening in your body to how to detect gluten in foods.

Gluten Free Class Topics

What you will learn:
• What is the concern with gluten and autoimmune diseases
• How does your digestive tract repair and what can you do about it
• How to test for gluten intolerance and other sensitivities
• Get complete names and labels for gluten in manufactured foods, cosmetics and care products

Gluten Free Class Seating Limited. Please call 972-930-0260 to register.

Going Gluten Free March 20 7pm Central Market Plano

Gluten-Free 101 – Beyond the Basics
Free Celiac and Gluten Intolerant Educational Class!

Going Gluten Free Class Location

Central Market Plano

320 Coit Road, Plano 75075

Wednesday 20, 2013 from 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Learn How Going Gluten Free may be the solution you are looking for.  Get In-depth Answers to Your Burning Questions about Gluten, Celiac and Gluten Intolerance. What is the difference between Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance? What ingredients do I need to look for to be safe? How do we become sensitive to gluten? Should I consider going gluten free?  Join Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT of Living Well Dallas – Certified Nutritionist and Education Leader for the Gluten Intolerance Group of Greater Dallas for an informative in-depth discussion about going gluten free from what is happening in your body to how to detect gluten in foods.

Going Gluten Free

What you will learn:
• What is the concern with gluten and autoimmune diseases
• How does your digestive tract repair and what can you do about it
• How to test for gluten intolerance and other sensitivities
• Get complete names and labels for gluten in manufactured foods, cosmetics and care products

Seating Limited. Please call 972-930-0260 to register.

Going Gluten Free April 30 6:30pm

Gluten-Free 101 – Beyond the Basics
Free Celiac and Gluten Intolerant Educational Class!

Going Gluten Free Class Location

Living Well Health & Wellness Center

14330 Midway, Dallas, 75244. Phone: 972-930-0260.

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013 from 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Learn How Going Gluten Free may be the solution you are looking for.  Get In-depth Answers to Your Burning Questions about Gluten, Celiac and Gluten Intolerance. What is the difference between Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance? What ingredients do I need to look for to be safe? How do we become sensitive to gluten? Should I consider going gluten free?  Join Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT of Living Well Dallas – Certified Nutritionist and Education Leader for the Gluten Intolerance Group of Greater Dallas for an informative in-depth discussion about going gluten free from what is happening in your body to how to detect gluten in foods.

Going Gluten Free

What you will learn:
• What is the concern with gluten and autoimmune diseases
• How does your digestive tract repair and what can you do about it
• How to test for gluten intolerance and other sensitivities
• Get complete names and labels for gluten in manufactured foods, cosmetics and care products

Seating Limited.  Click Here to Register for the Class.

Going Gluten Free January 29 6:30pm

Gluten-Free 101 – Beyond the Basics
Free Celiac and Gluten Intolerant Educational Class!

Going Gluten Free Class Location

Living Well Health & Wellness Center

14330 Midway, Dallas, 75244. Phone: 972-930-0260.

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 from 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Learn How Going Gluten Free may be the solution you are looking for.  Get In-depth Answers to Your Burning Questions about Gluten, Celiac and Gluten Intolerance. What is the difference between Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance? What ingredients do I need to look for to be safe? How do we become sensitive to gluten? Should I consider going gluten free?  Join Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT of Living Well Dallas – Certified Nutritionist and Education Leader for the Gluten Intolerance Group of Greater Dallas for an informative in-depth discussion about going gluten free from what is happening in your body to how to detect gluten in foods.

Going Gluten Free

What you will learn:
• What is the concern with gluten and autoimmune diseases
• How does your digestive tract repair and what can you do about it
• How to test for gluten intolerance and other sensitivities
• Get complete names and labels for gluten in manufactured foods, cosmetics and care products

Seating Limited. Please call 972-930-0260 to register.

Start Thanksgiving Off Right by Participating in the Turkey Trot


By Betty Murray

No better way to start your Thanksgiving Day than with a little exercise! Join thousands of other Dallas residents in the 2012 Capital One Bank Dallas YMCA Turkey Trot in Downtown Dallas.

This is the largest Thanksgiving Day event of its kind in the country. Last year, more than 38,000 men, women and children participated. Were you there? Don’t miss out this year!

The Trot offers a 5k run/walk and an 8 mile run. The 5k is designed to accommodate every member of your family, from infants to grandparents. Even friendly dogs on leashes are invited to participate! (Dogs must be registered.) Wheelchairs and strollers welcome. The event begins at 9 a.m., wheelchairs at 8:59 a.m.

Gather your friends and family for a bit of pre-Turkey Trot training, and register for the run today! Register online or visit any Luke’s Locker location through Nov. 21. The race fee is $30 for an untimed race, $35 for a timed race. You may choose from the 5k or 8 mile course.

Getting exercise in the morning will kick start your metabolism, and get your body started burning calories. If you’re on a diet or trying to lose weight, don’t let the participating in the Turkey Trot be your excuse to overeat at your Thanksgiving dinner. Remember to drink plenty of water and eat small portions.

Enjoy your Thanksgiving Day with no regrets the morning after.  The Turkey Trot is a great, fun way to encourage health and fitness for the whole family. Get a group of family and friends together to run with you. With just a week left until Thanksgiving, there’s little time for training, but if it’s been a while since you’ve hit the gym, try to get out for at least two light jogs between now and Thanksgiving Day!

Fun Fact: The 2011 Turkey Trot set a world record for the largest gathering of people dressed as turkeys!

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

 

More Healthy Fall Foods


By Betty Murray

Daylight Savings Time has ended, Halloween is now behind us and Thanksgiving is just around the corner. With the cooler fall temperatures come some of my favorite fall vegetables. Many people equate fall holidays with weight gain, but there are a number of fall foods that are healthy and rich in nutrients.

As a continuation of my previous article about healthy fall foods, here a few more of my favorite fall vegetables:

Eggplant — Best in the fall, eggplant is an excellent source of phytonutrients, flavonoids (a powerful antioxidant), fiber, manganese, potassium, thiamin, copper, magnesium and vitamin B6. Brush some olive oil on sliced eggplant and bake them, or enjoy them on a grilled sandwich with tomatoes.

Spinach — A dark, leafy green that has health benefits all year round, spinach is packed full of nutrients including flavonoids and anti-inflammatories. Lutien, another nutrient found in spinach is known to help prevent cataracts and certain cancers. Spinach is also a rich source of fiber, vitamins A and C, folate, calcium and magnesium.

Leeks — Weather you sauté them with vegetables, or enjoy them in a bowl of hot soup, Leeks contain many of the same health benefits as onions and garlic. They are also a source of fiber, vitamin C, folate, potassium and calcium.

Beets — Beets contain betacyanin, which is thought to help prevent cancer. Can’t stomach boiled or pickled beats? Try roasting them and serving them as a side dish. Other nutrients found in beets include vitamins A and C, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, folic acid and iron.

Carrots — Your mom wasn’t lying when she told you eating carrots is good for your eyes. Carrots are a rich source of carotenes, which are thought to be good for both vision and skin. They are also high in fiber and a source of vitamins A, B1 and C, riboflavin and niacin.

Shop the local farmer shed at the Dallas Farmer’s Market to find the freshest, organic fall vegetables.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

Pumpkin Seeds: Small seeds, big health benefits


By Betty Murray

Did you know pumpkin seeds are packed full of nutritional benefits. When it’s time to carve pumpkins this year, don’t be too quick to throw away the seeds. Pumpkin seeds are a delicious and nutritious snack, in fact, they are some of the most nutritious seeds we can eat.

Pumpkin seeds are rich in several nutrients, including Omega 3s, fiber, iron, magnesium and zinc, which are all essential for a healthy body. They have health benefits for both men and women. Pumpkin seeds contain zinc, which helps to promote prostate and bone health in men. They also contain anti-inflammatory properties, which can help individuals with arthritis. The phytosterols found in pumpkin seeds (as well as pistachios, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds) can even help lower cholesterol.

Other ways pumpkin seeds can benefit your health:

  • Eating pumpkin seeds can help you get a good night’s sleep. They are rich in the sleep-enhancing amino acid, tryptophan, which converts to serotonin in your body and helps you sleep.
  • High in protein, which stabilizes blood sugar and helps promote weight loss.
  • Rich in magnesium, which benefits heart health.
  • High in iron, which boosts energy and production of blood.

 

Pumpkin seeds can be purchased in packaged containers year around, but who not take advantage of fresh pumpkin seeds this fall? Now is the ideal time to enjoy the flat, green seeds. If stored in an airtight container and refrigerated, the seeds you pull out of your jack-o-lantern will even stay edible for several months.

There are several ways to enjoy pumpkin seeds, but roasting them is an all-time favorite. To prepare pumpkin seeds, remove them from the pumpkin and remove any pulp on them. Let the seeds dry overnight, before roasting them in the oven. Set your oven temp to about 160 degrees, and bake for 15-20 minutes. This light roasting will help seal in the healthy oils the seeds contain.

The seeds can be eaten on their own, drizzled lightly with olive oil, or added as a crunchy topping to vegetables, salad, cereal and even cookies. There are a number of delicious pumpkin seed recipes, but one favorite recipe is spiced pumpkin seeds.

You will need:

1 ½ tablespoons of melted margarine
½ teaspoon of salt
1/8 teaspoon of garlic salt
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
2 cups raw whole pumpkin seeds

For complete directions to this recipe, click this link to AllRecipes.com

Carving pumpkins is always a fun, family holiday. Get the most out of your pumpkin carving by enjoying the benefits of a delicious, nutritious pumpkin seed snack.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

Healthy fall foods found at the Farmer’s Market


By Betty Murray

Dallas is enjoying a slight drop in temperatures this week, reminders that the sweltering summer heat is over for another year. The fall season ushers in the holidays, which for most people means more parties, more celebrations and more eating.

Eating fall foods doesn’t have to equal weight gain. There are plenty of healthy fall foods that are rich in nutrients. Get out to the Dallas Farmer’s Market and pick up these and your other favorite fall foods:

Squash — Acorn squash, a variety of winter squash, is sweeter than summer squash and is delicious when baked with a touch of fall spice, like cinnamon, ginger or a hint of brown sugar. Acorn squash contains omega-3 fatty acids, which are an essential component of a healthy diet. They are also a great source of vitamin A.

Pumpkin is another type of winter squash. It is also sweet, which is why you so often find it in pies, breads, cakes and cookies. What you may not know about pumpkin is that it is rich in potassium, fiber and B vitamins.

Pomegranates — While they can be difficult to find, the Farmer’s Market is guaranteed to have pomegranates when they are in season (August through December). This tart fruit is high in vitamin C and folate. It’s also a great source of antioxidants.

Brussels sprouts — Don’t turn your nose up just yet, Brussels sprouts contain vitamin K, folate and are an excellent source of iron. If you don’t prefer their flavor, try baking them with a drizzle of olive oil and a few spices, or combining them with balsamic vinegar.

Sweet potatoes — Sweet potatoes can typically be found year around, although their harvest season is September through December. Chances are you’ll get a good dose of sweet potatoes on Thanksgiving Day, probably in casserole recipe combined with a lot of sugar and maybe even marshmallows. Sweet potatoes are packed full of nutrients including vitamin A and iron. They can even act as an anti-inflammatory. Be careful not to combine sweet potatoes with too many other high-calorie ingredients. Roasted or baked sweet potato wedges are a healthy replacement for mashed potatoes or French fries.

Take advantage of these fall foods, especially the variety of winter squashes. Remember, when preparing these foods avoid cooking them with overly fatty or high-calorie ingredients. Many of them have a vibrant flavor, which can be enhanced with a dash of spices.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.

To lose weight, less is more when it comes to exercise


By Betty Murray

If you’re looking to lose weight by working out, you will likely be disappointed in the results. Are you in denial that you need to change your eating habits in and exercise regularly to lose weight? Over the years, multiple studies have confirmed that exercise yields little weight loss when not combined with a change in diet. Surprisingly, new data reveals that less exercise may be more beneficial for weight loss.

A new study by researchers at the University of Copenhagen reveals that when trying to lose weight, less may actually be more. The study managed a control group of guys who maintained their diet and sedentary lifestyle, a group of guys who were asked to exercise 60 minutes each day and burn about 600 calories, and another group who were asked to exercise 30 minutes each day and burn 300 calories. In the end, the group of guys who worked out for just 30 minutes each day lost more weight.

Why? Researchers aren’t entirely sure of the reason, but consider two factors to be to blame. First, the men who worked out for 60 minutes each day also ate more calories each day. Additionally, those men were more fatigued, which in turn led to a primarily sedentary lifestyle outside of the 60 minutes of exercise. The men who only worked out for 30 minutes each day had more energy to continue to move and be active throughout their day.

What does this mean for you?

If you are trying to shed unwanted weight, don’t chain yourself to the gym for an hour or more each day. Moderate amounts of exercise (at least 30 minutes each day), combined with a low-calorie diet will yield the weight loss you desire. If working out is a struggle for you, here are a few tips to keep you motivated:

  • Choose exercise you enjoy. Whether it’s running, walking, Zumba, yoga or any other form of exercise, if you enjoy it you will be more likely to keep it up.
  • Exercise with a friend or in a group class. The majority of people are not self-motivated when it comes to exercise. Find a friend who enjoys the same form of exercise as you to workout with you. If you can’t find a friend, join a group fitness class at your gym.
  • Change it up. Variety isn’t only good for your brain, it’s also good for your body. Adding variety into your workout routine will keep your muscles from growing accustom to any one type of exercise. In the end, you’ll be more motivated by the change in routine and may even lose more weight.

Betty Murray, CN, HHC, RYT is a Certified Nutritionist & Holistic Health Counselor, founder of the Dallas-based integrative medical center, Wellness and founder of the Metabolic Blueprint wellness program. Betty’s nutrition counseling practice specializes in metabolic and digestive disorders and weight loss resistance. A master of the biochemistry of the body, Betty teaches her clients how to utilize nutritional interventions to improve their health. Betty is a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Nutrition Professionals.